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Round Table on the Species at Risk Act: Response of the Minister of the Environment

 

April 11th, 2008


Executive Summary

This document presents the response of the Minister of the Environment to the recommendations of the First Round Table on the Species at Risk Act (SARA) held in December 2006. The Round Table, attended by 110 participants representing a broad cross section of interested parties, sought to encourage a dialogue among a wide range of groups on how to improve the conservation of species and the protection and recovery of species at risk. 

Round Table Recommendations

The recommendations of the Round Table participants fall under five key outcomes:

  1. Improving Efficiency and Accountability
  2. Strengthening the Use of an Ecosystem Approach
  3. Promoting a Conservation Legacy
  4. Improving Consideration of Socio-Economic Factors in SARA Decision Making
  5. Facilitating the Engagement of Aboriginal Peoples.

The full set of recommendations is provided in the Summary of Proceedings and the Report on the Minister’s 2006 Round Table under the Species at Risk Act posted on the SARApublic registry.

Response

The Minister and the Government of Canada are strongly committed to the conservation agenda in Canada. The Government of Canada has provided significant investments both to federal departments to implement legislative programs and also to partners to deliver specific land-based initiatives. This document provides the response of the Minister of the Environment to the Round Table recommendations. It outlines the progress of the three departments responsible for SARA implementation – Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada and the Parks Canada Agency - under each of the five theme areas, noting current activities and possible future directions.

Key initiatives highlighted include work on:

  • strengthening program governance, including implementing effective governance structures that include results-based management and accountability frameworks, strong interdepartmental coordination, and advisory mechanisms;promoting inter-jurisdictional cooperation, focusing on establishing cooperative partnerships with provincial/territorial governments based on recognition of the responsibilities and capacities of each order of government, in accordance with the National Framework for Species at Risk Conservation;
  • continuing development of a suite of federal policies outlining the principles and objectives guiding the implementation of SARA;
  • improving regulatory compliance, through development of a SARA compliance promotion program;
  • promoting stewardship, through funding of community stewardship programs;
  • building public awareness, through several departmental initiatives;
  • strengthening the practice of socio-economic assessment among federal departments by promoting coordination and sharing best practices;
  • strengthening the existing mechanisms for Aboriginal involvement in all phases of the SARA process;
  • building Aboriginal capacity for engagement, through the Aboriginal Capacity Building Fund and Aboriginal Critical Habitat Protection Fund; and
  • establishing an effective process for involving wildlife management boards in the North.

Reporting on Progress

Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, and the Parks Canada Agency are committed to maintaining an ongoing dialogue with interested parties on how to effectively implement species at risk initiatives. The First Ministerial Round Table was an important part of this dialogue. It is expected that future Round Tables will be held every two years.

Other opportunities for stakeholder input on an ongoing basis include the major advisory mechanisms such as the Species at Risk Advisory Committee, which includes representatives from environmental organizations, industry and agricultural organizations; and the National Aboriginal Council on Species at Risk.

To promote accountability, the departments will regularly review and report on their progress in implementing the legislation through such mechanisms as the SARA Annual Report, and the annual departmental performance reports to Parliament.


Table of Contents

 

 

Introduction

This document presents the response of the Minister of the Environment to the recommendations of the First Round Table on the Species at Risk Act (SARA) held in December 2006. 

The document organizes and summarizes the recommendations of the Round Table participants under five key outcomes, and provides a perspective on progress under each of the five areas, noting current directions. Activities and initiatives outlined in the document reflect collaborative efforts between Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, and the Parks Canada Agency in setting common directions and policies.

Background on SARA

In 1992, Canada became the first industrialized nation to ratify the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity, pledging to conserve biological diversity, to use its components sustainably and to share equitably the benefits arising from the use of genetic resources. Implementation of the Convention required, among other actions, the development of a Canadian Biodiversity Strategy to provide strategic direction and a framework for action at all levels of government.

Under the Canadian Constitution, conservation of species at risk requires a collaborative approach among all jurisdictions. The provinces and territories hold primary responsibility for the management of many terrestrial wildlife species in Canada and lands upon which many species rely. The federal government, meanwhile, exercises direct responsibility for migratory birds listed under the Migratory Birds Convention Act (1994), aquatic species, and species at risk on federal lands. As a result of this need for collaboration, a key component of the Strategy was the 1996 Accord for the Protection of Species at Risk, which outlines the commitments of federal, provincial and territorial governments to identify species at risk, protect their habitats and develop recovery plans.

The federal Species at Risk Act (SARA) is a key instrument to ensure Canadian implementation of commitments under the Convention on Biological Diversity. SARA came into full force in 2004. Its objectives are to:

  • prevent wildlife species from being extirpated or becoming extinct;
  • provide for the recovery of wildlife species that are extirpated, endangered, or threatened as a result of human activity; and
  • manage species of special concern to prevent them from becoming endangered or threatened.

The Species at Risk Act:

  • promotes the role of stewardship and voluntary measures in protecting species at risk;
  • promotes a cooperative approach among federal, provincial and territorial governments to protecting and recovering species at risk;
  • promotes the principle that, if there are threats of serious or irreversible damage to a wildlife species, then cost effective measures to prevent the loss of the species should not be postponed for a lack of full scientific certainty;
  • is consistent with Aboriginal and treaty rights;
  • promotes engagement of Aboriginal communities and organizations
  • establishes a process for listing wildlife species as extirpated, endangered, threatened, or special concern, recognizing the role of Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) in assessing and identifying species at risk;
  • establishes a legal list of species at risk (Schedule 1);
  • provides legal protection for individuals of species under federal jurisdiction that are listed as extirpated, endangered or threatened, and their residences, by establishing prohibitions against certain actions;
  • provides for the protection of critical habitat through a series of measures, which may include prohibitions;
  • establishes a framework for species recovery through the development of recovery strategies and action plans for extirpated, endangered and threatened species;
  • establishes a framework for the development of management plans to prevent species of special concern from becoming further at risk and to promote their recovery;
  • provides for an assessment of environmental effects of projects likely to affect a listed wildlife species or its critical habitat; and
  • creates a public registry to assist in making documents under the Act more accessible to the public.

The Minister of the Environment is responsible for the administration of SARA, and cooperates with the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans Canada and the Parks Canada Agency to ensure effective implementation of the Act. 

Minister’s Round Table

In December 2006, pursuant to section 127 of the SARA, the Minister of the Environment convened the first Round Table of persons interested in matters respecting the protection of wildlife species at risk in Canada to advise the Minister on those matters. The Round Table sought to encourage a dialogue among a wide range of groups on how to improve the conservation of species and the protection and recovery of species at risk.

The two-day Round Table, held in Gatineau, Quebec, was attended by 110 participants representing a broad cross section of interested parties (see Annex 1 for a list of the participants).  Participants included individuals affiliated with regional and municipal governments, Aboriginal organizations, communities, industry and business groups (including renewable and non-renewable natural resource use and extraction groups), academia, public advocacy groups (including environmental and conservation groups), and youth.

Discussions at the first Round Table were structured around three themes to inform federal implementation of conservation and recovery efforts. The themes were:

  • using an ecosystem approach to protect and recover species at risk;
  • considering socio-economic factors to improve SARAdecision making; and,
  • promoting Canada’s conservation legacy.

Over the course of the discussions, two additional cross-cutting themes emerged:

  • improving the efficiency and accountability of the implementation of SARA; and
  • facilitating the engagement of Aboriginal peoples in SARA.


Round Table Recommendations

The recommendations of the Round Table participants fall under five key outcomes:

1: Improving Efficiency and Accountability

2: Strengthening the Use of an Ecosystem Approach

3: Promoting a Conservation Legacy

4: Improving Consideration of Socio-Economic Factors in SARA Decision Making

5: Facilitating the Engagement of Aboriginal Peoples.

The full set of recommendations is provided in the Summary of Proceedings and the Report on the Minister’s 2006 Round Table under the Species at Risk Act posted on the SARA public registry (see Annex 2). (Note that given the number and diversity of participants, and the breadth and complexity of the themes addressed, the objective was to collect views but not to reach consensus on recommendations submitted by participants.) 

1: Improving Efficiency and Accountability

Throughout the Round Table discussions, participants agreed that the federal government must play a unique role in providing solid policy direction, good governance processes, transparent decision-making, and timely, clear communication of information. At the same time, it was acknowledged that implementation of SARA must continue and that the protection of species must not be delayed as policy is developed and governance processes are established.

2: Strengthening the Use of an Ecosystem Approach

Ecosystem approaches have been successfully used in planning and implementing recovery measures for species at risk in Canada. These approaches make it easier to recognize and address overlaps in species range and needs, positive conservation synergies, interdependencies and potential conflicts, as well as common underlying problems.

Round Table participants agreed that ecosystem approaches should be applied to species at risk conservation, and that there is a need for federal leadership and coordination in this effort, for example, in the area of developing practical tools and pilot projects. There also was general consensus on the need to develop a clear and common working definition of “ecosystem approaches”. 

Some participants cautioned that these approaches might not be appropriate in all cases. Other participants noted that efforts to apply ecosystem approaches should not delay or inhibit species at risk conservation efforts.

3: Promoting a Conservation Legacy

The Canadian identity is strongly linked with landscapes and the biodiversity they sustain. Canada’s Biodiversity Strategy speaks to encouraging individuals and communities to understand and appreciate the value of biodiversity and the causes of its decline, if efforts to conserve biodiversity are to succeed.

Round Table participants emphasized that the Canadian public values biodiversity and considers its conservation a priority. They identified a variety of mechanisms that could be used to promote a conservation legacy, and noted that there is an important role for education, incentives, and promotion to change behaviour, and to reinforce and foster actions that support species at risk conservation.

4: Improving Consideration of Socio-Economic Factors in SARADecision Making

Socio-economic analysis is a tool that provides information to decision makers on the scale and distribution of benefits and costs associated with a proposed action. It is being used to inform decisions being made on SARA actions.

Round Table participants strongly expressed the view that socio-economic analysis needs to be conducted in a consistent and transparent manner. Participants urged the departments to evaluate socio-economic analysis approaches and methodologies currently applied in the federal government and other jurisdictions, with a view to developing guidelines and standardized procedures for practitioners.

5: Facilitating the Engagement of Aboriginal Peoples

SARA recognizes and reaffirms the rights of Aboriginal peoples under section 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982, which establishes the Government of Canada’s legal obligations that help shape consultations with and accommodation of Aboriginal peoples and their rights. SARA also recognizes that the engagement of Aboriginal peoples is essential to the effective implementation of the Act by including many provisions for consultation and cooperation with Aboriginal peoples affected by species assessment, recovery and protection measures.

The need to strengthen the involvement of Aboriginal people in the implementation of species at risk programs emerged as an important cross-cutting theme during the Round Table, touching on all three original themes. Many participants stated that Aboriginal peoples play a key role in the successful protection and recovery of species at risk. They suggested that Aboriginal traditional knowledge should be considered when applying the ecosystem approach, considering socio-economic factors to improve SARA decision making, and when promoting Canada’s conservation legacy. 

There was recognition that this requires collaboration and the development of tools to support the significant role that Aboriginal peoples play in the conservation and protection of species and their habitat.

Response

The Government of Canada remains fully committed to the Species at Risk Act as illustrated by recent announcements such as the allocation of increased resources for the program in Budget 2007 (including increased funding for stewardship and Aboriginal engagements), and recent announcements of land-based conservation initiatives such as the protection of Pelee Island under the Natural Areas Conservation Program and the withdrawal of over 10 million hectares of land near the East Arm of Great Slave Lake and around the Ramparts River and Wetlands in the Northwest Territories. Over the past few months, the Government of Canada has announced investments up to $375 million in funding for conservation programs, which is the largest investment in conservation ever. This includes $225 million for sensitive species and ecosystems with the Nature Conservancy of Canada, $30 million for the Great Bear Rainforest, and millions for Stanley Park in Vancouver and Point Pleasant Park in Halifax. In addition, the government announced the expansion of Nahanni National Park Reserve and Sahoyùè –ehdachoé Great Bear Lake in the Northwest Territories.

In addition to these large conservation initiatives that will benefit species at risk in Canada, the three departments responsible for SARA have made significant progress under each of the five Round Table theme areas. This section provides the Minister’s response to the Round Table recommendations. It outlines progress of the departments under each of the five theme areas, noting current activities and possible future directions.

1: Improving Efficiency and Accountability

Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, and the Parks Canada Agency are committed to meeting their responsibilities under SARA in an efficient, timely and transparent manner that values continual improvement while recognizing the legislative frameworks of the federal government, provincial and territorial governments, the provisions of treaties and Land Claim Agreements, and the role of Wildlife Management Boards. 

The federal approach to species at risk conservation management consists of a cycle of five inter-dependent elements: assessment; protection; recovery planning; implementation; and monitoring and evaluation. The delivery of activities under these elements is supported by a number of horizontal support and governance mechanisms that integrate and coordinate activities across the cycle.

Governance

The establishment of governance structures for inter-jurisdictional cooperation is central to the effective implementation of SARA. Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada and the Parks Canada Agency are committed to protecting species at risk in Canada through a cooperative partnership approach with provincial and territorial governments. This approach is based on recognition of the responsibilities and capacities of each order of government.

Reflecting this commitment, the departments are negotiating bilateral agreements on species at risk with all provinces and territories. The agreements set out shared objectives, as well as specific commitments where the governments will cooperate on species at risk initiatives. As of late 2007, agreements have been signed with the governments of British Columbia, Quebec, and Saskatchewan, while agreements with other provinces and territories are at various stages of negotiation. The bilateral agreements set up a Species at Risk Coordinating Committee that serves as a forum for the province/territory to work with federal representatives on species conservation issues in each region.

Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, and the Parks Canada Agency work regularly with provincial and territorial governments through a number of mechanisms, including the Canadian Endangered Species Conservation Council and the Canadian Committee of Fisheries and Aquaculture Ministers.

Governance mechanisms for interdepartmental cooperation and coordination are also critical to the effective implementation of SARA. The three departments work through a governance structure agreement that sets out the federal decision-making structures and mechanisms to support the implementation of SARA. The agreement includes senior-level federal coordinating structures to enable a consistent policy approach across the federal government. Departmental implementation of SARA is guided by the following principles:

  • results-based governance policies and mechanisms clearly identify goals, expectations and accountabilities;
  • responses to issues are consistent, coordinated and predictable;
  • processes to facilitate the achievement of objectives and the early identification of issues are clear; and
  • on-going review and reporting of performance is conducted.

SARA is implemented in each department via results-based structures to provide for the development of policies, tools and mechanisms that ensure implementation and enforcement are carried out in a manner that is accountable to both Parliament and Canadians. This approach includes the development of a Results-Based Management and Accountability Framework and Risk-Based Audit Framework to define expected results for SARA and identify performance and risk indicators, promoting effective management decision-making and accountability.  The three departments assess progress regularly, looking at key factors such as the number of recovery strategies posted and the number of species assessed and listed. 

Coordination among the three departments on SARApolicy and operations is undertaken through: an Associate Deputy Minister-level committee to provide strategic direction; an Assistant Deputy Minister-level committee for policy; and a Director General-level for operational matters.

The governance structure also includes supporting and advisory structures to strengthen implementation of SARA and promote greater accountability. These structures include: the Species at Risk Advisory Committee (SARAC), which includes representatives from environmental organizations, industry and agricultural organizations; and NACOSAR, the National Aboriginal Council on Species at Risk.

Policy Development

Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, and the Parks Canada Agency have worked with other jurisdictions to develop the National Framework for Species at Risk Conservation. This framework, which has been approved by federal, provincial and territorial Ministers responsible for species at risk, helps guide the protection of species at risk in Canada. The framework provides the basis for a renewed federal vision for SARA and its implementation programs. The framework is based on:

  • the experience gained to date in implementing SARAand federal/provincial legislation;
  • integrated policy development to reflect the linkages among various aspects of the legislation and the broader context of the Accord for the Protection of Species at Risk;
  • a clear identification of goals, expectations and mechanisms; and
  • a commitment to a shared federal-provincial-territorial role in policy and program development and delivery.

Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, and the Parks Canada Agency are collaborating on the development of SARA-specific policies under this national framework, including policies addressing assessment, protection, species recovery planning, implementation, and monitoring and evaluation.

2: Strengthening the Use of an Ecosystem Approach

“Ecosystem approach” refers to a means of undertaking species at risk assessments and recovery actions in a manner that groups species on the basis of shared geographical proximity, ecological interactions and/or threats. It reflects:

  • an emphasis on large-scale, system-wide perspectives;
  • a focus on the composition and processes of ecosystems and their complexities;
  • a recognition of the need for integration across multiple scales of concern (ecological, economic, social and cultural); and
  • the recognition of long-term sustainability of the ecosystem as a management goal.

Applying an ecosystem approach involves: the use of sound science and adaptive management; cooperation, collaboration and participatory decision-making; and the integration of social values and the recognition that humans are an integral part of ecosystem processes. 

The three responsible departments continue to explore how ecosystem approaches can be more formally addressed within different phases of the overall SARA process. At the same time, any expansion in the use of ecosystem approaches must be consistent with the primary objectives and obligations of SARA to conserve and protect individual species.

Ongoing and Future Initiatives

There are more than 20 multi-species and area-based ecosystem recovery initiatives underway in Canada, involving a large number of people from governmental and non-governmental organizations. The experience, working relationships and scientific knowledge gained through these initiatives can support the expanded use of ecosystem approaches within SARA. SARA decision makers and practitioners can take advantage of this experience to develop the tools, guidelines, procedures, and training needed to support this expansion. The departments work collectively sharing information, knowledge and practices. Implementation is geared in each department to its current work.

Environment Canada

Environment Canada is currently working to apply an ecosystem approach to environmental management. The work includes exploring how an ecosystem approach could be enhanced at each phase of the SARA process. 

For example, recovery work under SARA is expected to increasingly apply the ecosystem approach through the establishment of multi-jurisdictional recovery teams. These teams, with federal and provincial/territorial members, are well-positioned to address multi-species and ecosystem planning, by building on local and regional expertise and experience and developing action plans that can involve all the relevant players.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Forward-looking approaches to resource conservation (e.g., area-based planning under the Oceans Act and modernized fisheries management plans) are converging with evolving approaches to assessment and recovery planning under SARA. Government marine science that has traditionally focused on fisheries is now re-focusing on integrated advice and support that assesses important ecosystem features and functions, and identifies and monitors ecosystem trends.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada has conducted research, planning, and consultations supporting multi-species management marine fisheries for several species at a time. Examples of multi-species management projects include the 2002-2007 Groundfish Management Plan for Scotia-Fundy Fisheries and the 2004-2006 Canadian Atlantic Swordfish and Other Tunas integrated management plan. In addition to multi-species experience, these plans also feature specific provisions to meet SARA requirements.

Fisheries and Oceans Canada also has recently completed Ecosystem Overview and Assessment Reports on all three coasts. These reports analyze and interpret the interactions among ecosystem components, and between human activities and the ecosystem, in an Integrated Ecosystem Assessment. 

These assessments identify a number of species as ecologically significant, warranting special management measures, with SARA species as one subset.  Ecosystem Overview and Assessment Reports can help determine the likelihood and potential severity of harm to ecosystem structure or function as a result of perturbations, particularly those caused by manageable human activities. Thus, they have immediate application to recovery planning and monitoring, and could prove valuable for the assessment work of COSEWICand others. Recovery practitioners, for example, will be able to use available information and coordinate recovery efforts with on-going management interventions. 

Parks Canada Agency

The Parks Canada Agency is exploring how to plan recovery actions for multiple species at risk based on sites (including the concept of the Greater Park Ecosystem) rather than based on a single species approach. Each action plan is intended to integrate protection, recovery planning and on-the-ground actions, awareness building, public education and monitoring as required for the diversity of species at risk occurring in the target area. This global approach to recovery will provide a coherent and comprehensive plan for species at risk that can be integrated into other land use planning processes such as park management plans.  For example, Parks Canada is leading an international, multi-jurisdictional landscape-level conservation planning effort in Grasslands National Park greater ecosystem, a focal area for species at risk in Canada, with 15 species currently listed under the Species at Risk Act, and close to 100 species considered rare in the Province of Saskatchewan. The Parks Canada Agency is also leading an ecosystem-based approach for recovery planning for the Garry Oak Ecosystems, which are among the rarest and most imperiled ecosystems in Canada. As a result, three recovery strategies covering a total of 20 species have been finalized, and action planning is underway.

Tools

A number of scientific and technical tools have been developed in recent years to support greater application of ecosystem approaches. One tool that could become standard practice is a matrix examining the potential impact of all proposed recovery actions on all the co-occurring species at risk and important ecosystem features and processes. As well, the evolving use of indicators and reference points within fisheries plans is also worth considering in the design of recovery strategies. These tools can be used on multiple scales – from measuring disturbance of habitat to measuring declining species diversity.

COSEWIC

COSEWIChas established a working group to identify opportunities for strengthening the communication of ecosystem considerations in status reports. The secretariat is also expected to construct a database of all species at risk and associated attributes (such as habitat and threats) so that future status reports can include a summary of species at risk co-occurring with the species being assessed.

However, efforts to expand the use of ecosystem approaches cannot compromise COSEWIC’s legislated responsibilities to assess the status of individual wildlife species it considers may be at risk, to decide when species are to be assessed, and to give priority to those species most likely to become extinct. Species at the greatest apparent risk of extinction must receive the highest priority, irrespective of the ecosystem they inhabit.

Other Challenges

As participants in the Round Table noted, there are data and methodological challenges to expanding the use of the ecosystem approach in species at risk conservation and protection. Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada and the Parks Canada Agency are working together to address these challenges, recognizing that it will be a long process of learning and continuous improvement. For example, the departments are starting to address how to improve data to support appropriate grouping of species at the assessment stage, and how to develop effective approaches to engagement and on-going support and partnerships for ecosystem-scale recovery.

3: Promoting a Conservation Legacy

Promoting a conservation legacy is a core element of SARA that needs to be maintained and strengthened through cooperative efforts of governments, industry and other interested organizations. The ultimate goal of SARA is conservation of biodiversity, and this goal must lie at the heart of all decisions and actions related to the identification, protection and recovery of species at risk. Efforts must focus on preventative approaches and early intervention to prevent species from becoming at risk.

However, promoting a conservation legacy is truly a shared responsibility among all Canadians. The Government of Canada is committed to working with other jurisdictions and partner organizations to promote conservation in all regions of the country, through, for example, its support for civil society groups to work on safeguarding special areas such as the Great Bear Rainforest on the central coast of British Columbia.

The three departments responsible for SARA are actively promoting and supporting stewardship and voluntary actions for protection and recovery of species at risk. This includes working with partners to increase awareness and understanding, build capacity and increase engagement of Canadians in conservation actions. 

Community Funding Programs

Federal funding programs support important work by communities and individuals carrying out “on the ground” conservation of habitat and species in local areas. Environment Canada is committed to ensuring that its federal stewardship programs, such as the Habitat Stewardship Program and Eco-Action, continue to support improved awareness of species at risk conservation and stewardship efforts in communities across Canada. 

Public Awareness and Education

Environment Canada

A strategic and coordinated approach to delivering nature-related education and outreach activities is now specified as a result under Environment Canada’s new results structure. This coordinated approach seeks to enhance appreciation for nature and biodiversity among Canadians and encourage action by Canadians to protect and conserve nature.

Through this coordinated approach, Environment Canada aims to increase awareness of the value of nature among Canadians, create a greater sense of connection between Canadians and nature, and encourage Canadians to take action in support of the conservation and protection of nature. This effort supports Environment Canada’s broader strategic results around biodiversity conservation, protection and conservation of wildlife and managing lands and landscapes in a sustainable fashion. 

Environment Canada will continue to undertake a range of public engagement activities to promote conservation and raise awareness among Canadians. These include online sites, kiosks, fact sheets, posters and bookmarks for various Programs such as the Bird Banding Program, the Ecological Gifts Program, and the Piping Plover Conservation Program. 

Parks Canada Agency

Through its onsite interpretation and outreach education programs, the Parks Canada Agency is reaching Canadians at home, at leisure, at school and in their communities with the aim of increasing understanding, appreciation, support and engagement with respect to the conservation and recovery of species at risk; and of building a sense of connection fundamental to the promotion of a conservation legacy.

Public education and engagement initiatives at Parks Canada are guided by the Ecological Integrity and Species at Risk Outreach Education Strategic Plan. They are carried out at the national, regional and site-specific level and seek to connect Canadians to their natural heritage and species at risk by providing effective and relevant learning opportunities; to improve the state of species at risk through an issue-focused approach to species at risk education; and to maximize the effectiveness of species at risk education by strengthening capacity within Parks Canada and its networks. Examples of such initiatives include interpretive exhibits, trails and programs; citizen science initiatives engaging local communities and volunteers in ecological inventory, monitoring and restoration efforts; species at risk educational products, games and content of the Parks Canada website; and national outreach education initiatives on key issues related to the conservation and recovery of species at risk (e.g. invasive species, road mortality, climate change).

As an example of activities carried out at the site level, the Parks Canada Agency is leading a project in Kejimkujik National Park of Canada in Southern Nova Scotia to increase conservation capacity and leadership in the region by engaging local residents and park visitors in hands-on recovery efforts for species at risk. An extensive volunteer and stewardship program has been developed, where park visitors, local community members, and aboriginal communities in southern Nova Scotia are working closely with recovery scientists and stewardship coordinators, undertaking recovery efforts for species at risk in the area. As a result, local citizens feel empowered to contribute to regional conservation efforts and planning processes for the benefit of species at risk and ecological integrity. As of December 2007, 230 people have been involved in the program, tallying 9800 volunteer hours.

Partnerships on Education and Awareness

Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, and the Parks Canada Agency will continue to build and strengthen partnerships in support of conservation promotion. Environment Canada, for example, is focusing on building partnerships to increase access to quality curriculum-linked learning materials. It is looking to accelerate the uptake of nature-based education in the formal system through existing provincial/territorial working groups, and is seeking expansion of existing efforts at experiential learning by supporting the public education and awareness work of civil society organizations. Collaboration with Environment Canada on the development and delivery of training workshops on Public Engagement for recovery teams, and of Environmental Education and Engagement workshops for Environment Canada and Parks Canada Agency staff and their networks are also examples of how capacity-building is being developed in support of promoting a conservation legacy.

Current partnerships include working with: the Canadian Wildlife Federation (Hinterland Who's Who); the Royal Botanical Gardens (National Focal Point for the Global Strategy for Plant Conservation); the Pollination Canada Network (Seeds of Diversity); and the Adopt a River Program and network.

Regulatory compliance

Compliance promotion on specific regulations under SARA helps build awareness within key groups and communities about the contribution of a particular regulation or initiative to the broader goals of conservation. Current initiatives to improve the understanding of regulatees about their roles and responsibilities include: SARA and You, a series of guides to help regulated communities understand their responsibilities; and Permitting Qs and As. Both of these are available through the SARA registry website.[1]


4: Improving Consideration of Socio-Economic Factors in SARADecision Making

Analysis of all important economic, cultural, social, health, and environmental benefits and costs associated with a given proposal, including the perspectives of partners and stakeholders on those benefits and costs, is an integral part of providing high-quality, balanced advice to decision-makers, through a well-documented, consistent and transparent process under SARA.

The departments agree that there is a need to continually improve socio-economic analysis, including by sharing knowledge and best practices. Government-wide guidelines, including the Cabinet Directive on Streamlining Regulations, the Guide to Cost-Benefit Analysis and the Triage Framework, also provide guidance and advice to analysts regarding consistent methods for S-E analysis and a framework for assessing the scope and depth of analysis that is appropriate in given circumstances.

National survey on the importance of nature to Canadians

Environment Canada, in cooperation with Fisheries and Oceans Canada and the Parks Canada Agency, is working with Statistics Canada to evaluate the feasibility of and options for reintroducing the national survey on the importance of nature to Canadians. The survey, which assesses the social and economic value of nature-related activities to Canadians, would help federal, provincial governments and other decision makers better understand the views of Canadians and identify gaps in awareness with respect to conservation and protection of the environment.

The national survey, which was conducted by Statistics Canada on behalf of federal and provincial conservation agencies in 1981, 1987, 1991, and 1996, examined the popularity of nature-related recreational activities, participation in these activities, and the benefits to the economy resulting from spending directly related to these activities. Socio-economic insights based on survey results would contribute to the management of Canada's wildlife, water, forests, and protected areas that are essential for the public's enjoyment of nature-related activities.

Interdepartmental working group

Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, and the Parks Canada Agency have formed an interdepartmental working group to bring together economists and social scientists to promote best practices and consistency with respect to the application of economic methods, including screening tools. The departments will work to share and discuss the methodologies used in an effort to learn from others. Through these transparent efforts, the departments will be better able to continually improve the analysis required in support of high-quality, balanced advice for SARA decision making. 

Socio-economic framework

Fisheries and Oceans Canada has prepared a socio-economic framework in support of SARA that describes when and how socio-economic analysis should be conducted for aquatic species and presents related guidelines. This framework includes guidance on Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s stakeholder and peer review process and is consistent with overarching federal guidance.

Socio-economic screening tool

Environment Canada has developed a socio-economic screening tool to help identify and provide a preliminary assessment of the socio-economic issues that may arise in connection with the decision to list a species. The tool also is designed to assist in determining the appropriate depth of socio-economic analysis that may be needed by decision-makers, given the particular biological, geographic, ecological, cultural and economic circumstances within which the species occurs.

There is an intention to discuss the further development of Environment Canada’s screening tool with an external advisory group, with a view to further improving it and better integrating it into the overall consultations process for listing of species.


5: Facilitating the Engagement of Aboriginal Peoples

Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, and the Parks Canada Agency remain firmly committed to building on existing work to engage Aboriginal peoples throughout the SARA cycle of assessment, protection, recovery planning, implementation, and monitoring and evaluation. The departments are investigating initiatives in the areas of improved mechanisms for involvement, funding for capacity building, and a strengthened process for involving wildlife management boards in the North.

Opportunities for Aboriginal engagement

The National Aboriginal Council on Species at Risk (NACOSAR)

NACOSARwas established under SARA to advise the Minister of the Environment on the administration of the Act, and provide advice and recommendations to the Canadian Endangered Species Conservation Council. It consists of six representatives of the Aboriginal peoples of Canada selected by the Minister based on recommendations from Aboriginal organizations that the Minister considers appropriate.

The council’s current objectives include: establishing a clear and transparent process for transferring advice to the Minister and Environment Canada; ensuring the long-term stability and capacity of the council; identifying species at risk issues of particular concern to Aboriginal peoples; addressing the use and protection of Aboriginal traditional knowledge; and enabling Aboriginal participation in species at risk conservation.

In support of these objectives over the coming year, NACOSARhas been asked to provide input to the departments on criteria for the funding programs (see below), develop an Aboriginal engagement framework, conduct an analysis of Aboriginal involvement in SARA recovery planning processes, and advise on Aboriginal involvement in the Habitat Stewardship Program.

COSEWIC’s Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge Subcommittee

Under SARA, COSEWICmust conduct assessments using the best available information on the biological status of a species, including scientific knowledge, community knowledge and Aboriginal traditional knowledge. COSEWICrecently established an Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge subcommittee as a means to strengthen the consistent use of Aboriginal traditional knowledge in its species assessments.

Aboriginal Funds

Aboriginal Funds for Species at Risk have been established to support the ability of Aboriginal peoples to work cooperatively with departments on species protection and recovery actions. The funds also provide for the sharing of Aboriginal traditional knowledge as a key component of species recovery measures, and help build stronger working relationships among those engaged in protection and recovery actions. There are two separate funds:

  • Aboriginal Capacity Building Fund is designed to help Aboriginal organizations and communities across Canada build capacity to enable them to help in the protection of species at risk; and
  • Aboriginal Critical Habitat Protection Fund is designed to work toward meeting the high priority needs of habitats that are home to many endangered and threatened species.

Environment Canada and Fisheries and Oceans Canada are working to develop a common approach to project funding by developing a shared vision of goals and expected outcomes. Consultation with Aboriginal peoples on the funds is providing a better understanding of Aboriginal perspective on the use of these funds. The departments are committed to improve efficiency in the administration of the funds and priorities that are identified through a shared understanding between government and Aboriginal people of the best use of the funds.

Strengthening processes for involving wildlife management boards

Conservation of species at risk on comprehensive land claim agreement lands requires consultation with wildlife management boards. To that end, Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans, and the Parks Canada Agency have negotiated a Memoranda of Understanding with the Nunavut Wildlife Management Board to harmonize the process for the listing of wildlife species at risk under the Species at Risk Act with the requirements of the Nunavut Land Claim agreement. The harmonized process is expected to facilitate the involvement of Inuit peoples and result in more effective conservation of endangered species. Should this approach prove to be effective, similar agreements may be considered for other wildlife management boards if required.

Reporting on Progress

Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans, and the Parks Canada Agency are committed to maintaining an ongoing dialogue with interested parties on how to strengthen SARA. The First Ministerial Round Table was an important part of this dialogue. Future Round Tables are scheduled to be held every two years. Other opportunities for reporting results on a periodic basis include the major advisory mechanisms such as SARAC and NACOSAR, and the upcoming Five-Year Review of SARA.

To ensure effectiveness and promote accountability, the departments also will regularly review and report on their progress in implementing the legislation through such mechanisms as the SARA Annual Report, the annual departmental performance reports to Parliament, and a general report on the status of wildlife species in Canada prepared every five years.

For More Information

Mary Taylor

Conservation Service Delivery and Permitting
Canadian Wildlife Service
Environment Canada,
351 St. Joseph Boulevard
Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0H3
Tel: (819) 953-9097

Susan Mojgani
Species at Risk Secretariat
Fisheries and Oceans Canada
200 Kent Street
Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0E6
Tel: (613) 990-0280

Gilles Seutin
Ecological Integrity Branch
Parks Canada
25 Eddy Street
Gatineau, Quebec, K1A 0M5
Tel: (819) 994-3953


Annex 1 - List of Round Table Participants

Invited Participants
NameAffiliation
Mellissa CooperAssembly of First Nations
Sue ScottCanada's Atlantic Salmon Federation
Nick SchultzCanadian Association of Petroleum Producers
Bonny CampbellCanadian Electricity Association
Karen EtheringtonCanadian Energy Pipeline Association
Brenda KennyCanadian Energy Pipeline Association
Peter de MarshCanadian Federation of Woodlot Owners
Robert MorleyCanadian Fishing Company, British Columbia
Gillian MacEachernCanadian Parks and Wilderness Society
Colin MaxwellCanadian Wildlife Federation
Sandy BaumgartnerCanadian Wildlife Federation
Alastair MacPheeCongress of Aboriginal Peoples
Jeffrey HutchingsDalhousie University, Chair of COSEWIC
Rachel PlotkinDavid Suzuki Foundation
Barrett LenoirDene First Nation
Aaron FreemanEnvironmental Defence
Pascal AlarieFédération québécoise de la faune
Patrick McGuinnessFisheries Council of Canada
Ghislaine St. AndréFondation de la Faune du Québec
Marcel ShepertFraser River Aboriginal Fisheries Secretariate
Daniel BanvilleGouvernement du Québec, ministère des Ressources naturelles et de la Faune
Line CouillardGouvernement du Québec, ministère du Développement durable, de l'Environnement et des Parcs
James GoudieGovernment of Nunatsiavut
Steven BrechtelGovt. of Alberta, Fish and Wildlife Division
Nancy WilkinGovt. of British Columbia, Ministry of Environment
James R. DuncanGovt. of Manitoba, Manitoba Conservation 
Mike SullivanGovt. of New Brunswick, Department of Natural Resources, Fish & Wildlife Branch
Joe BrazilGovt. of Newfoundland and Labrador, Department of Environment and Conservation
David CoffinGovt. of Newfoundland and Labrador, Department of Fisheries and Aquaculture
Dr. J. Sherman BoatesGovt. of Nova Scotia, Biodiversity Program
Simon AwaGovt. of Nunavut, Department of Environment
Kevin J. WilsonGovt. of Ontario, Ministry of Natural Resources
Lois DeaconGovt. of Ontario, Ministry of Natural Resources
Dave PhillipsGovt. of Saskatchewan, Department of Environment
Lynda YongeGovt. of the Northwest Territories, Department of Environment and Natural Resources
Joy WatersGovt. of Yukon, Department of Environment
Harvey JessupGovt. of Yukon, Department of Environment, Fish & Wildlife Branch
Jessica AnnisGreater Toronto Home Builders' Association - Urban Development Institute
Dale DrownGuide Outfitters Association of British Columbia
Peter L. MillerImperial Oil Limited
John CheechooInuit Tapiriit Kanatami (ITK)
Frank PokiakInuvialuit Game Council
Dulcie HouseLimestone Barrens Habitat Stewardship Program
Gabriella Mackenzie-ScottMackenzie Valley Environmental Impact Review Board
Roger HunkaMaritime Aboriginal Peoples Council
Dean TrumbleyMétis Nation British Columbia
Donald S. SharpMétis National Council
Anthony BelcourtMétis National Council
Gordon PeelingMining Association of Canada
Pierre GrattonMining Association of Canada
Henry LickersMohawk Council of Akwesasne, Department of the Environment
Bob StevensonNACOSAR
Allan MorinNACOSAR
Melody Nice-PaulNACOSAR
Byron LouisNACOSARcoordinator
Josh DuncanNative Brotherhood of British Columbia
Josephine MandaminNative Women's Association of Canada
Julie GelfandNature Canada
SARAh WrenNature Canada
Michael BradstreetNature Conservancy Canada
Charles-Antoine DroletNature Québec 
Kathleen MartinNova Scotia Leatherback Turtle Working Group
Gabriel NirlungayukNunavut Tunngavik Inc.
Joe TigullaraqNunavut Wildlife Management Board
Terry QuinneyOntario Federation of Anglers and Hunters
Tom HilditchOntario Stone, Sand & Gravel Association
Ron HallOsoyoos First Nation
Michael BurgessPrairie Conservation Action Plan
Doug WolthausenProfessional Habitat Specialist
Chris BlakeQuesnel River Watershed Alliance
Caroline CormierRéseau de milieux naturels protégés
Stephen HazelSierra Club of Canada
Devon PageSierra Legal Defense Fund
James GuptillTourism Industry Association of Canada 
Silvia D'AmeloTrout Unlimited Canada
Glenn JimTseycum First Nation
Vern JacksTseycum First Nation
Marco Festa-BianchetUniversité de Sherbrooke, past Chair of COSEWIC
Penny WhiteUniversity of British Columbia
Ken StewartUniversity of Manitoba
Stewart ElgieUniversity of Ottawa
Dan LaneUniversity of Ottawa - School of Management
Dean JacobsWalpole Island First Nation
Gwen BarleeWestern Canada Wilderness Committee
Justina RayWildlife Conservation Society - Canada
David BrackettWildlife Habitat Canada
Mike RussillWWF - Canada
Monte HummelWWF - Canada
Alon WeinbergYouth Environmental Network
   
Federal Government Officials
NameTitleAffiliation
Ian ShugartAssociate Deputy MinisterEC
Cynthia WrightAssociate Assistant Deputy MinisterEC
Donna StewartA/Director, Migratory Birds, Ontario Canadian Wildlife ServiceEC
Greg ThompsonDirector, Species at Risk, Canadian Wildlife Service, Environmental Stewardship BranchEC
Mary TaylorDirector, Program Operations BranchEC
Michele BrenningDirector General, Canadian Wildlife Service, Environmental Stewardship BranchEC
Patricia HouleActing Regional Director, Québec Canadian Wildlife ServiceEC
Paul KlucknerA/Regional Director General, Pacific & Yukon Region, Canadian Wildlife ServiceEC
Lucie McClungSenior Associate Deputy MinisterDFO
Bill DoubledayDirector General, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Economic Analysis and StatisticsDFO
John DavisSpecial Advisor To The Deputy Minister On Species At Risk DFO
Kevin StringerDirector General, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Resource Management DirectorateDFO
Pauline LalondeManager, Aboriginal ProgramsDFO
Susan MojganiDirector, Biodiversity Science Branch       DFO
Alan LatourelleChief Executive OfficerPCA
Doug StewartDirector General, National ParksPCA
Gilles SeutinResearch Manager, Species at RiskPCA
Mike WongExecutive Director, Ecological Integrity BranchPCA
Stephen WoodleyChief, Ecosystem SciencePCA


Annex 2 - Consolidated Round Table Recommendations

The MRTProceedings detail the recommendations generated at the round table, and reports them verbatim as they were delivered during discussions; summarizes the proceedings; and explains how recommendations submitted by participants were produced. Recommendations were put forward by tables of participants: as such they do not represent the consensus of all participants, and may even appear to be contradictory. The following consolidation combines similar recommendations, grouping them topically. In some cases participants identified recommendations as issues to consider; these items are listed under “Points for Consideration” in a separate table. 

 

Consolidated Recommendations

Theme 1: Using and Ecosystem Approach to Protect and Conserve Species

Policy & Governance

1.    That the Minister adopts an existing definition, such as that in Canada’s Biodiversity Strategy, or develop a working definition of the ecosystem approach for Canadians.

Recognizing that:

  • science and Aboriginal traditional knowledge are fundamental components;
  • the human dimension must be integrated;
  • SARA is one tool to remediate ecosystem problems; and
  • this definition must be applied to SARA within the context of the Biodiversity Outcomes Framework

Taken from Proceedings: EA1 recommendations 4, 5 (partially)


2.    That the Minister ensures that the ecosystem approach:

  • is built with federal, provincial and territorial colleagues, Aboriginal peoples, stakeholders and communities, to support shared objectives and to avoid conflicting decisions;
  • adopts a focus on prevention and precaution, putting conservation first
  • does not delay recovery and remedial actions;
  • includes an adaptive management approach.
  • provides for long term monitoring, evaluation and accumulation of baseline information; and
  • is structured to empower local stewards of biodiversity.

Taken from Proceedings: EA recommendation 6, 8, 10, 11

3.    That the Minister explicitly identify the coordinating mechanism, leadership and accountability for the ecosystem approach in Canada, building on the current work done by provinces and territories, sectors, Aboriginal peoples, and communities. The Minister must also recognize that connections to national programs (i.e. Biodiversity Outcomes Framework) and global initiatives (i.e. Convention on Biological Diversity) are needed.

Taken from Proceedings: EA recommendation 9

Implementation & Initiatives


4.     That ecosystem based approaches be used as one tool, where appropriate, to meet species at risk goals and objectives at the action planning stage.

Taken from Proceedings: EA recommendation 5 (partially)

5.    That the Minister begin to develop the required resources and tools for implementing the ecosystem approach in Canada. 

Taken from Proceedings: EA recommendation 12

6.    That the Minister develop a tool that existing groups can use to incorporate SARA considerations into their decision-making processes (i.e. build upon existing community consultation forums to develop an ecosystem analysis and recommended approach to dealing with and incorporate endangered species issues into existing community planning vehicles).

Taken from Proceedings: EA recommendation 1


7.    That the Minister, in partnership with other relevant federal Ministers, provincial and territorial governments, Aboriginal communities and stakeholders, supports case studies and pilot projects that would facilitate the exploration and evaluation of the effectiveness of the ecosystem-based approach.

Taken from Proceedings: EA recommendations 2, 3, and consideration 1 (partially)


Theme 2: Considering Socio-Economic Factors in SARA Decision-making


Policy & Governance


8.    That the Minister immediately establishes an independent evaluation of current SARA SE methodologies across departments and jurisdictions.

Taken from Proceedings: SE2 recommendation 8


9.    That the Minister set up an advisory panel of eminent persons (broad cross-section of stakeholders) in the short term to review the current SE framework, methodologies and approaches to consultation on the content of SE analysis. This committee could provide advice on the development of guidelines for practitioners.

Taken from Proceedings: SE recommendation 11


10.    That the Minister establish a committee on social progress and economic development that would offer independent advice on proposed SARA listing which should be made public.

Taken from Proceedings: SE recommendation 10


11.    That guidelines for provincial SE analysis are consistent with the federal SE analysis.

Taken from Proceedings: SE recommendation 9


12.    That the Minister change the terminology for SE analysis to better reflect the need to incorporate ecological considerations and benefits; suggestions included Ecological SE Evaluation, and Ecological SE Analysis.

Taken from Proceedings: SE recommendations 6 (partially), 16


13.    That the Minister ensures that SE considerations are equally as important in their contribution to decision making.

Taken from Proceedings: SE recommendation 2 (partially)


14.    That SE should be done at the time of legal listing using recovery scenarios to inform ministers of the consequences of listing. Consultation involvement of stakeholders and jurisdictions early in the process and in the review of the results is desirable. SE must be done in the broader context of all available conservation tools (e.g. existing legislation and stewardship programs).

Taken from Proceedings: SE recommendation 4


15.    That SE analysis should not include recovery cost at the listing stage.

Taken from Proceedings: SE recommendation 3


16.    That SE analysis:

  • include consideration of social importance of species, social values and way of life, intrinsic values of species, ATK, economic cost and benefits;
  • give greater weight to social and cultural component of SE than is now given;
  • recognize importance of subsistence values, aboriginal and community use; and
  • be done with engagement of Aboriginal peoples, communities, partners, NGOs, etc.

Taken from Proceedings: recommendations 6 (partially), 18, 20, 21 (partially)


17.    That SE analysis includes full cost accounting. This should encompass potential cost to landowners, the cost of stewardship incentives and land owner compensation that, among other things, addresses the ecosystem based-approach, aboriginal traditional knowledge and the implications on future generations.

Taken from Proceedings: SE recommendation 23


18.    That the Minister meets with aboriginal peoples to discuss the relevant issues of jurisdictions authority, capacity, policy, consultation and funding.

Taken from Proceedings: SE recommendation 17


19.    That the provisions of land claim agreements and processes are respected in the implementation of SARA.

Taken from Proceedings: SE recommendation 19


Implementation & Initiatives


20.    That the government encourage municipalities and industries to take a broader and longer term view of the implications of social and economic development initiatives in order to save money on mitigation in the future.

Taken from Proceedings: SE recommendation 24


21.    That the Minister ensures that not only economists are involved in SE analysis, acknowledging that Aboriginal peoples and landowners have not conducted SE impact studies on reserves and private lands to date, and that this capability needs to be fostered and supported by government.

Taken from Proceedings: SE recommendations 21 (partially), 22


22.    That the Minister ensures the procedure for SE analysis:

  • is standardized, drawing on a broad spectrum of best practices, and reflecting the value of species recovery;
  • takes into account short and long-term considerations;
  • is as transparent as species assessment;
  • is a progressive exercise and is updated as additional information is gathered (including at recovery and action planning stages);
  • publicizes the social and economic implications involved and offers a public comment period on potential SARAlistings; and
  • has documentation available in a timely fashion.

Taken from Proceedings: recommendations 1, 2 (partially), 5, 7, 25


23.    That the Minister ensures that recover planning:

  • identifies SE challenges through consultation and consideration of Aboriginal traditional knowledge;
  • identifies the means to address these challenges (e.g. compensation, re-training, economic opportunities, etc.)
  • recognizes that the concern over the socio-economic impact of identification of critical habitat has impeded its designation, and considers how to manage this process effectively.

Taken from Proceedings: SE recommendations 13, 14

Administration


24.    That a website be created that includes all COSEWICstatus assessments, tracking them throughout the listing process and stating the reasons for not listing species.

Taken from Proceedings: SE recommendation 12


25.    That the Minister nominate the members of the ATK sub-committee of COSEWIC.

Taken from Proceedings: SE recommendation 15


Theme 3: Promoting Canada’s Conservation Legacy

Policy & Governance

26.    That the Minister develop a process to explicitly formulate a conservation legacy for Canada:

  • working with and engaging Canadians in its development;
  • acknowledging the link to the health of Canadians;
  • addressing key aspects of the changing Canadian demography, e.g. rural communities, cities, the North, new Canadians, youth, etc.; and
  • consider that water be the pillar of the conservation legacy.

Taken from Proceedings: CL3 recommendations 4, 9


27.    That the Canadian Constitution be amended to incorporate the conservation legacy.

Taken from Proceedings: CL recommendation 8


28.    That the Minister makes a long term commitment through supporting, co-funding, and promoting a consortium of all partners, stakeholders and Aboriginal peoples to promote the conservation legacy.

Taken from Proceedings: CL recommendation 11 (partially)

Creation of Incentives


29.    That the government put in place incentives for effective conservation (e.g. negative income tax, rebates for energy efficient products, ecological goods and services, incentives that work for Aboriginal peoples), research and development.

Taken from Proceedings: CL recommendation 3


30.    That the Minister develop reward programs that recognize effective conservation, and reinforce conservation actions, down to the community level (including Aboriginal peoples and private land owners).

Taken from Proceedings: CL recommendation 6 (partially)


31.    That prospects for partnerships with other organizations and local communities be improved by providing seed funding on a timely and consistent basis, similar to that used by the Model Forest program, to ensure species protection and recovery, by:

  • streamlining accountability requirements;
  • exploring use of multi-year funding to ensure continuity; and
  • diverting species at risk funds currently housed in Inuit and Northern Affairs Canada to dedicated aboriginal funds and the Aboriginal traditional knowledge sub-committee within Environment Canada.

Taken from Proceedings: CL recommendation 15


Promotion


32.    That an aggressive marketing campaign for conservation legacy be developed including information on ecosystem benefits to Canadians, and recognizing that domestic tourism contributes to increasing environmental education.

Taken from Proceedings: CL recommendations 2 (partially), 12


33.    That the Minister reinstate the Importance of Nature to Canadians survey so that the marketing of the conservation legacy to Canadians, industry, and funding agencies can be integrated, research based, targeted, and used to support domestic tourism.

Taken from Proceedings: CL recommendation 2 (partially)


34.    That all federal departments and agencies be required to include promotion of nature conservation as a core Canadian value as part of their annual sustainability plan. The government must implement the entire range of tools available to them to instill nature conservation as a core value of Canadians, e.g. hunting, fishing, bird-watching, ecotourism. This could be done, for example, through greater exposure in the media, and use of programs including promotion contests for free day-passes in national parks, wildlife reserves, etc.

Taken from Proceedings: CL recommendation 5, 6 (partially)


35.    That the Minister promote meaningful ways to reduce consumption by individual Canadians by setting the tone, and leading by personal example (political leaders) on government commitments to sustainability.

Taken from Proceedings: CL recommendation 7


Education


36.    Recognizing that understanding is linked to supportive action, that the Minister works with federal, provincial and territorial colleagues and community partners, to develop programs and commit funding to:

  • educate Canadians about SARA and what it means to them (e.g. hunters, trappers, fishers, landowners;
  • promote the link between the conservation of species at risk and other environmental issues, such as climate change; and 
  • connect Canada’s youth and new Canadians to nature through environmental awareness and education.

Taken from Proceedings: CL recommendations 1, 6 (partially), 13, 14


37.    That the Minister provide citizens with information on the condition of their local environment so they are more knowledgeable and are able to make better choices (e.g. reinstate the State of the Environment reporting).

Taken from Proceedings: CL recommendation 10

EA1 – Using an Ecosystem Approach to Protect and Conserve Species

SE2 – Considering Socio-Economic Factors in SARA Decision-making

CL3 – Promoting Canada’s Conservation Legacy



[1] See The Species at Risk Act and You information guides, and General Questions and Answers on SARA Permits