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Aboriginal Fund for Species at Risk: Fifth–year Projects (2008–2009)


Atlantic Region 2008–2009

Monitoring Spillover of Atlantic Cod from the Gilbert Bay Marine Protected Area Using a Remote Acoustic Telemetry Network

A distinct local population of Atlantic Cod in Gilbert Bay, Labrador, was recently given protection through the establishment of a Marine Protected Area (MPA). Movements of cod inside the MPA, which have been studied for several years using acoustic telemetry, have indicated a seasonal migratory pattern for the population. Fish of commercial size migrate beyond the boundaries of the MPA during the summer; however, no tracking has been conducted outside the MPA. Commercial and recreational fishing pressure outside the MPA could negatively impact this Atlantic Cod population by overexploiting and selectively removing larger and potentially faster-growing fish from the population. The removal of large, mature fish from the breeding population could be detrimental. The proposed research would extend the existing acoustic network to areas outside the MPA to identify spillover and to monitor fishing activity in the vicinity of acoustically tagged Atlantic Cod.

Labrador Metis Nation

Enable MFN to Acquire, Develop and Use Knowledge to Play a More Active Role in the Implementation of SARAwithin its Traditional Territory

This project is intended to develop a species at risk coordinator for the Miawpukek First Nation (MFN). The coordinator will deal with all the issues related to the Species At Risk Act (SARA) that may affect MFN's traditions, customs, and livelihood within its traditional territory; represent MFN on all recovery strategies; relay all information gathered pertaining to SARA back to the community and the Miawpukek government; promote SARA policies throughout Miawpukek, with the governing body and the surrounding communities; incorporate these strategies into MFN's land- and marine-use plans; and represent MFN on other resource-use management or advisory boards.

Miawpukek First Nation

First Nation Participation in Recovery of iBoF Atlantic Salmon and the Status of American Eel

The project will build the capacity of Fort Folly First Nation and three other First Nation communities to participate in conservation initiatives for inner Bay of Fundy (iBoF) Atlantic Salmon and American Eel. Fort Folly staff and three First Nation youths from other communities will carry out data collection and monitoring activities for salmon and eels in three New Brunswick rivers. Marine research on iBoFsalmon migration and mortality will also be conducted using cutting-edge satellite telemetry. Our youth staff will conduct interviews with elders from their respective communities to document this knowledge as a way of communicating this project to community members and to incorporate this information into management strategies for the species in question. This project will serve to benefit youth staff by giving them the opportunity to gain valuable experience, skills and certifications in working with species at risk. It will also contribute meaningfully to the recovery of the endangered iBoF Atlantic Salmon and American Eel by advancing understanding of their conservation needs.

Fort Folly First Nation

Community-based Coastal Resource Inventory for Nunatsiavut and Nunatsiavut SARAStewardship Assistant: Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge (ATK) for Species at Risk: Phase II

The primary focus of these coastal resource inventory projects is to collect marine-based information such as species occurrence, traditional fishing areas and marine-related uses (e.g. fish processing plants and wharves). It may also include the collection and presentation of other types of information such as on tourism and recreational resources. Such inventories provide useful information for promoting economic development, conservation and management within the coastal zone (including the near-shore marine resources and land resources connected to the marine environment).

Nunatsiavut

The Development of a Species At Risk Program of the Mi'kmaq of Nova Scotia and the Implementation of a Species At Risk Listing Process Consultation Working Group

The purpose of the project will be to develop capacity of Mi’kmaq of Nova Scotia to participate in species at risk (SAR) activities. Specifically, this project will develop and/or implement a SAR consultation or listing process and begin the development of a provincial Mi’kmaq species at risk program. There will also be a need to coordinate with other Aboriginal organizations or community programs currently working on SAR issues. The project would be the start of a structured approach to Mi’kmaq involvement in SAR management.

Kwilmu'kw Maw-Klusuaqn (Mi'kmaq Rights Initiative)

First Nations Youth Species at Risk Awareness Initiative and Promoting a Greater Understanding of SARA among the NSMDC Member Bands

The North Shore MicMac District Council (NSMDC) would like to undertake a species at risk (SAR) awareness, outreach and capacity-development initiative within its member bands. There is a need for a proactive approach to First Nations awareness and understanding of SAR, and by targeting youth (elementary to university age) and engaging elders in sharing their traditional knowledge on SAR, we will promote greater awareness and engagement among the communities in general.

North Shore MicMac District Council (NSMDC) AAROM Fisheries Technical Unit

Development of a Multi-species (eel and Striped Bass), and Their Respective Critical Habitats, Monitoring Program and Conservation Strategy for the Richibucto River Watershed by Elsipogtog First Nation

The Elsipogtog First Nation (EFN) is leading a species at risk project on the American Eel and Striped Bass populations in the Richibucto River in New Brunswick. The project will examine adult population status, the use of estuarine and freshwater habitats by juveniles, migration patterns of eels in the river, and the effects of commercial fishery bycatch on juvenile and adult Striped Bass. EFN will use a blend of modern science and traditional ecological knowledge during the implementation of the project. The work will be carried out by EFN in partnership with Kouchibouguac National Park, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, and the University of Moncton.

Elsipogtog First Nation

My House to My Ocean – Adopting Economically and Socially Sound Measures to Conserve Marine Species at Risk and Their Habitats

The “My House to My Ocean” project seeks to redirect the involvement of Traditional Ancestral Homelands Aboriginal Peoples in the Maritimes Region to focus on marine species at risk and their habitats. The project will educate on Aboriginal peoples’ ecocentric world view (i.e. the interconnected and interdependent relationship between humans and the ocean) and teach that the recovery of marine species at risk begins with individuals and households. The project will also mentor community members to encourage their involvement in marine species recovery planning teams, recovery action teams, and other species at risk activities.

Maritime Aboriginal Peoples Council

Determination of Biological Characteristics of Adult Eels and Relationship of Elver Abundance to Estuarine Habitats Identified in the Bras d'Or Lakes

The project aims to address current gaps in knowledge regarding elvers and eels in the Bras d'Or Lakes, Nova Scotia. Data on length, weight, growth rates, spawner information, landings by the food fishery, presence/absence of swimbladder parasites, water quality, and elver abundance/occurrence in nearshore habitats will be collected. This information will complement local Aboriginal traditional knowledge to generate a more thorough and up-to-date understanding of local eel ecology in the Bras d'Or Lakes.

Unama'ki Institute of Natural Resources

Capacity Building, Historical Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Current Status Investigation of Endangered Species on Aboriginal Lands of the Restigouche River

The project will increase the capacity of a regional Aboriginal organization with respect to species at risk (SAR). This will be accomplished by training a scientific team to identify the Maritime Ringlet Butterfly, St. Lawrence Aster, and Harlequin Duck, and also to identify and survey their respective critical and/or key habitats on Aboriginal lands adjacent to the Restigouche and Nipisiguit River estuaries. Educational literature in the Mi'gmaq language will be produced (e.g. a newsletter and website). Public-awareness workshops will be organized in the First Nations communities and surveys of traditional ecological knowledge will be conducted to provide historical context.

Gespe’gewaq Mi’gmaq Resource Council

Piping Plover 2008 Protection, Education and Awareness

The project will monitor the Piping Plover in the St. George’s Bay area. Brochures will be prepared, printed, and distributed. Daily beach walks will be conducted to monitor Piping Plover populations and educate beach goers. Data sheets will be completed after each survey to document all data collected.

Mi'kmaq Alsumk Mowimsikik Koqoey Association (MAMKA)

Learning Critical Knowledge for Recovering Migijigig and Mtesgmug of Kespukwitk

The project will enhance local First Nations’ involvement in the recovery of regional species at risk by increasing public awareness and contributing to knowledge acquisition. It incorporates outreach and stewardship activities, collecting Mi’kmaw traditional knowledge about key species, assisting in locating and monitoring species, mapping species at risk on reserve lands, and maintaining/updating our community-driven database for several other rare or provincially listed species.

Bear River First Nation - L'sitkuk Enviro Centre

Eel Ground First Nation Striped Bass and American Eel Population Assessment

Eel Ground First Nation is situated along the northwestern branch of the Miramichi River in New Brunswick. This is the only known spawning grounds for Striped Bass in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence. As such, it is important to contribute to protecting this species by collecting Aboriginal traditional knowledge from the elders in the community and by collecting Striped Bass and American Eel sampling data from the Aboriginal Gaspereau trap net fishery.

Eel Ground First Nation

Maliseet Striped Bass and Eel Stewardship in the Saint John River Valley (Originally Nashwaak Watershed Culvert Survey)

A minimum of 300 culverts will be studied for the presence of barriers to fish passage within the Nashwaak Watershed. This project will benefit not only Striped Bass, but also Atlantic Salmon, eels and other species of special importance to the Maliseet First Nations. It is a collaborative effort between the Maliseet Nation Conservation Council and the Nashwaak Watershed Association Inc.

Maliseet Nation Conservation Council

MAMKA (FNI) Marine Species at Risk Project

The Mi'kmaq Alsumk Mowimsikik Koqoey Association (MAMKA) will conduct scientific research, document traditional knowledge, and produce public-awareness information on the American Eel, Banded Killifish, Shortfin Mako, and Atlantic Wolffish in Newfoundland. Other shark species as well as Northern and Spotted wolffishes, which are found in the coastal waters of Newfoundland, will also benefit from this project. MAMKA will operate in selected areas where members of the Federation of Newfoundland Indians are present. MAMKA will partner with Atlantic Coastal Action Program’s Humber Arm to create a wolffish and shark “Books for Boats” program. Reports, posters, presentations, photographs, videos, and various print and electronic materials will be available at www.mamka.ca following the completion of the project.

Mi'kmaq Alsumk Mowimsikik Koqoey Association (MAMKA)

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Quebec Region 2008–2009

Integrated Management of Species at Risk in Odanak Territory

In its integrated management plan for species at risk on Odanak territory, the Abenaki community of Odanak plans to carry out an inventory of at-risk plant and animal species and their habitats. A theme week will be organized and information updates produced to raise awareness about species at risk among the local population. In addition, the data gathered will contribute to recovery plans for the species present on the territory, an ecological zoning proposal, and the contribution of expert collaborators from various conservation specialties.

Odanak Band Council

Survey and Habitat Protection Measures and Habitat Management Activities of At-risk Species within the Territory of Eagle Village First Nation (Reptiles, Amphibians and Rare Plants)

The main aim of this project is to promote the importance of reporting sightings (traditional ecological knowledge, TEK) and sharing traditional knowledge to support the protection of targeted species at risk and their habitats.
To this end, the following measures will be taken:

  1. Follow-up on two nesting Peregrine Falcon pairs and a Bald Eagle after a wind storm. A survey of at-risk species of turtles and snakes within two areas of the traditional territory of Eagle Village First Nation.
  2. An implementation of surveillance systems in areas of intensive use by turtles for egg laying and experimental protective devices.
  3. Training of community members to conduct surveys of reptiles, rare plants and freshwater mussels.
  4. Classification of sensitive areas that may shelter at-risk vascular plant species until the evidence suggests otherwise.
  5. Recovery of the ginseng population at an appropriated site and identification of potential sites for natural populations.
  6. The surveying of sensitive areas to identify and locate at-risk species.
  7. Undertake an ecological characterization in an area dedicated to mining activity to protect the possibility of potential species and their habitat.
  8. The integration of sensitive areas, species, or habitats into the land management plan of the community to ensure their protection and consideration in the harmonization process.

Eagle Village First Nation - Kipawa

Lake Sturgeon, Wood Turtle And Butternut Monitoring and Protection on the Traditional Territory of the Anishinabe Community of Kitigan Zibi

The project is intended to improve knowledge of three species at risk in Canada: the Butternut, the Lake Sturgeon and the Wood Turtle. These three vulnerable species are present throughout the territory of the Anishinabeg community of Kitigan Zibi. Activities include carrying on the monitoring and protection programs for Wood Turtle populations on Eagle and Desert rivers, inventorying two new Wood Turtle populations located on Picanoc and Black rivers, respectively, completing the knowledge-acquisition work on the Lake Sturgeon population in the Desert River drainage basin by telemetry, confirming spawning grounds and migratory routes, and protecting sensitive areas.

The project is also intended to locate and characterize the huge Butternut population present on reserve lands. In parallel, an awareness-building campaign will be conducted among all the members of the community.

Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg

Wolverine Workshop

The Naskapi Nation of Kawawachikamach believes that the recovery of the Eastern Population of Wolverine must begin with a dialogue between Eastern and Western Canadian First Nations and the sharing of their traditional knowledge with the broader scientific community, especially with the Wolverine Recovery Team (Eastern Population). To this end, it is seeking to organize a workshop to which Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal stakeholders will be invited to share their knowledge of Wolverines and contribute to the recovery of the species. This workshop will be followed by awareness-raising among Eastern Canadian Aboriginal communities through the distribution of popular educational materials (pamphlets and videos) in the Aboriginal language.

Naskapi Nation of Kawawachikamach

Eastern Wolf Habitat Location and Determination on the Timiskaming First Nation Traditional Territory

The 2008 Timiskaming First Nation’s species at risk project will focus on the Eastern Wolf and the Wolverine. The goal is to collect data on wolf and coyote habitat use and genetic distinctiveness. Harmonization strategies will consider the wolf’s travel corridors to ensure they are protected. The Wolverine portion of the project will seek to determine whether or not there is a difference between the Western population and the Eastern population. Lastly, trappers will play an active role in the project in order to stay abreast of the status of the wolf and be in a position to react quickly in the interest of its conservation.

Timiskaming First Nation

Communication and Capacity-building Activities of the First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Sustainable Development Institute (FNQLSDI) on Species at Risk

The First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Sustainable Development Institute will liaise with communities that are undertaking projects on species at risk under the Aboriginal Funds for Species at Risk (AFSR) program. The FNQLSDI will assist in transferring knowledge on the Species at Risk Act (SARA) by taking part in training courses organized by the federal departments concerned. First Nations and their organizations will therefore build capacity under SARA.

The FNQLSDI will conduct a feasibility study on a possible consultative team from our organization. It will develop expertise and strengthen the capacity of First Nations and federal departments for the conservation, protection and recovery of species at risk and their habitats. The FNQLSDI will also reply to the many requests it receives and provide advice and counsel to federal departments during consultations with First Nations.

First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Sustainable Development Institute

Encouraging Community Participation in Protecting Species at Risk and their Habitat in Kahnawake

This project will develop community awareness about species at risk in Kahnawake and encourage community participation in the protection of species at risk and their habitats. Newsletters focusing on habitat protection and stewardship will be produced and distributed to the community. Communication strategies will be developed and outreach campaigns carried out for some of our target species (Lake Sturgeon, Butternut and Least Bittern). Butternut Silviculture Guidelines will be developed to assist community members in dealing with the Butternut canker. Awareness-raising among youth will be achieved by hiring a summer student to assist with the project and hosting a one-week summer day camp focusing on SAR. A SAR field guide will also be produced and distributed to the schools in order to convey important traditional ecological knowledge about our species at risk.

Kahnawake Environment Protection Office

Implementation of an Effective Strategy for the Recovery of the Val-d’Or Woodland Caribou Herd

This year, the Anicinapek Council of Kitcisakik is implementing a Woodland Caribou re-introduction project in their natural habitat to increase herd numbers to a viable level. This initiative will be taken in collaboration with specialists on the species, the Quebec Ministère des Ressources naturelles et de la Faune, and other regional players. The strategy should also protect mature softwood stands from pressure by forestry operations. Predators (Black Bears, wolves) will be controlled, thereby increasing the level of knowledge of the Eastern Wolf, another species at risk.

Anicinapek Council of Kitcisakik

Knowledge Acquisition and Management Plan for Woodland Caribou, Boreal Population, at Nitassinan, Innu First Nation of Essipit

The project involves the acquisition of new knowledge about the critical habitat conditions for sustaining the Woodland Caribou on the Nitassinan territory at Essipit. Communication activities will raise local awareness of the precarious state of the species. Community members will be asked to contribute information on caribou presence and mortality control by predators or poachers. This information will be used to produce a specific management plan for this metapopulation that reconciles forestry and resort development in the species’ range.

Innu Council of Essipit

Developing Stewardship Mechanisms for Species at Risk and their Habitat in Kahnawake

The overall purpose of this project is to work with landowners and decision-makers to encourage stewardship activities and other forms of community participation in the protection of species at risk (SAR) and their habitats. We will work with decision-makers and landowners to carry out detailed inventories on land hosting priority species such as the Least Bittern and the Butternut. Four areas will be selected and site-specific stewardship manuals will be prepared to present inventory results, management options and conservation recommendations. We will meet with the decision-makers and landowners to present the manuals and discuss options for collaborative efforts to protect the SAR and their habitats in each area. Bird inventories will also be carried out on the Least Bittern, Golden-winged Warbler, Cerulean Warbler, Short-eared Owl, Chimney Swift and Common Nighthawk. Research will be conducted on land acquisition or exchange options and formal agreement options to protect SAR and their habitats, and efforts will be made to incorporate SAR protection into local laws, policies and guidelines.

Kahnawake Environment Protection Office

Encourage Wemotaci Community Members to Enumerate Species at Risk on their Family Lands and Implement Conservation Practices for these Species

The aim of this project is to encourage members of the Wemotaci community to report the presence of species at risk on their lands. The band council is urging community members to be especially attentive, during the spring and fall cultural weeks and over the summer, to record sightings of species at risk on their land for the purpose of protecting them. A cartographic directory of the presence of species at risk and the introduction of respectful practices toward these species are among the outcomes of this project.

Atikamekw Council of Wemotaci

Aboriginal Communities, Involvement in Characterization and Protection of Habitats

The Agence Mamu Innu Kaikusseht seeks to obtain the commitment of two Innu communities in protecting St. Lawrence marine species. To this end, eight Innu will be trained in aquatic and marine resource management by transferring knowledge of critical habitat characterization techniques for species at risk in the two Innu communities of Uashat-Maliotenam and Unamen Shipu. The two species targeted by the project are the Atlantic Cod and the American Eel.

Agence Mamu Innu Kaikusseht (AMIK)

Awareness-building and Monitoring of Innu and Micmac Aboriginal Fishers on the Adequate Behaviour to Adopt regarding the Various Marine Species at Risk in the St. Lawrence

The Agence Mamu Innu Kaikusseht, in collaboration with the Réseau d’observation de mammifères marins, seeks to encourage active fishers in eight Innu and Micmac communities located on the shores of the St. Lawrence to take part in the recovery of some at-risk marine species they are likely to encounter while fishing. To this end, a training workshop and an education kit on the status of the target species, their proper identification and how to act in their presence, will be provided (e.g. reporting of bycatches, releasing them back to the water, recording of observational data, etc.).

Agence Mamu Innu Kaikusseht (AMIK)

Sampling of Bowhead Whale Subsistence Harvest in Nunavik 2008

The stock of Eastern Arctic Bowhead whales is now understood to be a single stock and it is shared among Canadian Inuit in Nunavut, Nunavik and in Greenland. It is currently classified as “endangered” by COSEWIC. Nunavik Inuit are determined to relaunch a subsistence hunt of bowhead. This project forms part of an important co-management strategy to provide genetic and biological samples to contribute to sound management of the species. Through such co-operation between Inuit hunters and government managers, the sustainable harvest of this species will be encouraged.

Makivik Corporation

Namè

Further to the interest shown by the community about the decline in the quantity and quality of Lake Sturgeon, Harricana River (James Bay) population, and its designation as a species of special concern by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC), the First Nation Council has developed a project aimed at raising the community’s awareness about the status of the species and establishing a recovery program for it. The following activities will be carried out:
drafting of a questionnaire to evaluate the consumption of sturgeon by the population; assessing the number of fish caught annually by the community and identifying traditional fishing spots (spawning sites); determining the Algonquin toponymy for spawning sites and recording observations on the evolution of the species related to environmental changes;
establishing the distribution area for the sturgeon on our land at Blouin Lake up to the 50th parallel and assessing spawning sites on the Harricana River and its tributaries; monitoring and analyzing sites known to be frequented by the population.

Abitibiwinni First Nation Council

Sampling of Beluga Subsistence Harvest in Nunavik 2008

The stock of Eastern Hudson Bay Beluga is classified as “endangered” by COSEWIC, but continues to be an important food source and culturally important species for the Inuit of Nunavik. This project is part of a major joint management strategy to provide genetic samples necessary for stock identification (the harvest includes the more abundant, non-endangered Western Hudson Bay stock of Beluga Whales) and teeth for age structure analysis. Such co-operation between Inuit hunters and government managers is a way to encourage the sustainability of this species.

Makivik Corporation

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Ontario Region 2008–2009

Ways of Knowing Partnership, Turtle Island Conservation Initiative

At the request of our First Nations community partners, the goals of the Turtle Island Conservation Initiative (TICI) are to build capacity in conservation and best management practices. This is to minimize the impacts of land and resource use on at-risk turtles, wetland species and their habitats through the recognition and recovery of traditional knowledge (TK). The TICI will engage First Nations community partners (pilot program initiated with Wasauksing First Nation) to facilitate elder-youth dialogue, traditional ways of knowing, outreach education in First Nation schools, and the development of curriculum resources in two First Nations languages. This initiative will promote dialogue and knowledge preservation within and between First Nations communities.

Toronto Zoo

Lake Sturgeon Habitat Utilization and Migration Patterns

This project will assess the Lake Sturgeon population of the Pic River, which flows into Lake Superior at the Pic River First Nation and Pukaskwa National Park. It will be undertaken by the Anishinabek/Ontario Fisheries Resource Centre (A/OFRC) and Pic River First Nation, in partnership with the Department of Fisheries and Oceans and the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, between May and December of 2008. The project will be designed to assess the important habitat requirements of Lake Sturgeon, a species which is listed as threatened by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). All captured sturgeon will be sampled for biological information and externally tagged with a unique number. A subsample of the adult population will be implanted with radio-transmitter tags to determine fish movements and important habitat use. In addition, traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) will be used to identify target areas for the field assessments and increase knowledge of Pic River Lake Sturgeon as well as their cultural significance. An education and outreach program will also be introduced to raise awareness of the species’ biology and its conservation status.

Anishinabek/Ontario Fisheries Resource Centre (A/OFRC)

Species At Risk (SAR) Inventories and Identification of Important Habitat for Forked Three-awned Grass and Other Species at Risk on Beausoleil First Nation

Species At Risk (SAR) inventories and identification of important habitat for Forked Three-awned Grass (Aristida basiramea) and other at-risk species will be conducted by Beausoleil First Nation. The work will support the development of a land-use plan, a First Nation’s Forked Three-awned Grass action plan, and conservation agreements with certificate-of-possession holders. Informal committees will develop and participate in outreach initiatives to engage the community’s interest in adhering to the land-use plan for future development by First Nations people and certificate-of-possession holders. The land-use plan will serve to protect our traditional knowledge (TK) and medicinal plants and act as the link between Native land use and the distribution of Forked Three-awned Grass and other species at risk.

Beausoleil First Nation

Documentation of Woodland Caribou Critical Habitats in Relation to Recreational Values in Woodland Caribou Provincial Park, Ontario

This critical habitat protection project will integrate indigenous knowledge (IK) and traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) with conventional Western scientific knowledge to protect calving and nursery habitats of Woodland Caribou on the protected landscape of Woodland Caribou Provincial Park. To demonstrate positive collaboration among First Nations, this project will also collect significant cultural information and, when necessary, forward the information to the Woodland Caribou Park Office to ensure protection of the site.

Lac Seul First Nation

Survey of Polar Bear Migration and Habitat in Fort Severn First Nation

The community of Fort Severn First Nation is conducting a survey of Polar Bears and their migratory patterns and habitats in their traditional territory. Local guides, youths and elders are working with Lakehead University and coordinators from Keewaytinook Okimakanak to collect, analyse and share local cultural and traditional knowledge for the purpose of better understanding the effect of climate change on Polar Bears.

Fort Severn First Nation #215

Population Status and Enhancement Strategy for Species at Risk on Nipissing First Nation Lands

This project will support the activities of the Nipissing First Nation (NFN) Natural Resources Department, which is looking to document and protect species at risk on Nipissing First Nation lands. Community members will be asked by a resource technician to recall where they have seen these species of interest. Field work conducted by NFN technicians will be used to map the sightings of these species at risk and their various habitats. The information collected will be used to draft a plan aimed at protecting and enhancing these species at risk and ensuring their continued survival on Nipissing First Nation lands.

Nipissing First Nation

Population Status and Enhancement Strategy for Lake Sturgeon in Lake Nipissing

The Nipissing First Nation is leading a comprehensive study project on Lake Sturgeon in Lake Nipissing to understand its population status and habitat needs and to develop a plan to protect and enhance this ancient species. Lake Sturgeon in Lake Nipissing have been fished to near-extinction over the last century and much of their habitat has been degraded by industry. Little is known about its present status (whether it is in recovery or decline) in the lake. Additionally, the Nipissing First Nation--through a series of studies that include radio-telemetry, tagging of juveniles and adults, and mapping of habitats--intends to acquire the information necessary to protect and enhance the existence of sturgeon in Lake Nipissing. A recovery plan will be developed with input from the communities around Lake Nipissing once all the data are analyzed.

Nipissing First Nation

Ochiichagwe’babigo'ining Ojibway Nation Lake Sturgeon Stewardship Project

The Ochiichagwe'babigo'ining Ojibway Nation Lake Sturgeon Stewardship Project will provide valuable information for the development of an effective recovery strategy for Lake Sturgeon in the Winnipeg River system. The project will support the capacity of the community to contribute to its successful implementation and facilitate the Ochiichagwe'babigo'ining Ojibway Nation’s ability to continue to act as stewards of the land and to actively participate in the conservation and restoration of Lake Sturgeon in their traditional territory. The recovery strategy will include historical information based on aboriginal traditional knowledge (ATK) of population levels and habitat requirements in the area along with data provided by the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources on the current status of Lake Sturgeon populations in the Winnipeg River system. This will allow the most efficient use of resources when developing and implementing the recovery strategy for Lake Sturgeon.

Ochiichagwe’babigo'ining Ojibway Nation

Critical Habitat Protection – Woodland Caribou – Wabaseemoong Traditional Use Area - Woodland Caribou Provincial Park

This critical habitat protection project will integrate indigenous knowledge (IK) and traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) with conventional Western scientific knowledge to protect calving and nursery habitats of Woodland Caribou on the protected landscape of Woodland Caribou Provincial Park. This project will also collect significant cultural information and, where necessary, forward the information to Woodland Caribou Park Office to ensure protection of the site.

Wabaseemoong Independent Nations

Sharing the Wisdom of the Alderville First Nation Black Oak Savanna

This project will support educational and outreach activities at the Alderville Black Oak Savanna to assist in developing a more robust nature education program. This practical ecological restoration project is intended to raise awareness of one of the most endangered habitats in the world, the Black Oak Savanna and Tallgrass Prairie. Programs will be developed and delivered to teach schools, community groups and area residents about the wonders of some of our species at risk and the steps that can be taken to aid in their recovery and protection.

Alderville First Nation

Identification and Verification of Woodland Caribou Habitat in the Whitefeather Forest

The goal of this project is to consolidate Pikangikum traditional knowledge (TK) of Woodland Caribou habitat. Existing data, which is currently scattered among several project-specific data sets, will be compiled into a single database in order to comply with the requirements for inclusion in forest management and species at risk recovery planning. Interviews with Pikangikum elders will be conducted to fill in any data gaps identified through the consolidation exercise. The project will provide a more complete description of Woodland Caribou habitat values in the Whitefeather Forest which will, in turn, support the identification, protection and restoration of Woodland Caribou habitat in a resource management context.

Whitefeather Forest Management Corporation

Documentation of Woodland Caribou Critical Habitats in Relation to Recreational Values in Woodland Caribou Provincial Park, Ontario

This critical habitat protection project will integrate indigenous knowledge (IK) and traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) with conventional Western scientific knowledge to protect calving and nursery habitats of Woodland Caribou on the protected landscape of Woodland Caribou Provincial Park. This project will also collect significant cultural information and, where necessary, forward the information to Woodland Caribou Park Office to ensure protection of the site.

Whitefeather Forest Management Corporation

Species at Risk Assessment Surveys and Implementation of Recovery/Protection Methods on Wikwemikong for Species At Risk

This project focuses on the Wikwemikong Indian Reserve, which prides itself on being a progressive First Nation that has always played a leadership role. Wikwemikong has begun the process of collecting information on the status of the species at risk found on its territory. With a land-use plan currently in development for its 54 000-plus hectares of land, the collection of important information such as federal and provincial species at risk on the reserve is vital to ensuring its protection from development or extraction in the coming years and crucial for other land planning or allotment projects.

Wikwemikong Unceded First Nation (Lands Department)

First Nation Stories and Art Work of Species at Risk

In this project, Curve Lake student-staff, under the supervision of the manager of education and with the support of academics and archaeologists, will conduct interviews with community elders to collect aboriginal traditional knowledge (TK) and local stories of species at risk. Communication products will highlight the more general, non-sensitive information on each species by means of posters and one-page vignettes. These products will be made available to the public. The project and resulting products will support a new educational centre at Curve Lake, whose opening will be marked by a local, invitation-only celebration where the stories of these species will be told through traditional oral communications. Any sensitive information on the species at risk will remain under the ownership of Curve Lake, to use at its discretion.

Curve Lake First Nation

Encouraging Landowners’ Participation in Conserving Habitat for Massasauga Rattlesnake and Other Snakes on O'Donnell Point

This project supports a community outreach program on learning to identify, document, and live with snake species, particularly the Massasauga Rattlesnake, in the Twelve Mile Bay area. This area encompasses the O'Donnell Point Nature Reserve and Moose Deer Point First Nation, which is included in the Georgian Bay Biosphere Reserve. The program is intended to enhance relationships among residents and cottagers, with each other and with nature, as they learn to protect the diversity of snake species along the Point and surrounding area. Moose Deer Point First Nation is part of the Ecosystem Protection Group (Twelve Mile Bay Community Association, Tadenac Club, Westwind Forestry, WahWahTaysee, SanSouci and Copperhead Associations, Manitou Association, Township of Georgian Bay, Ministry of Natural Resources and Ontario Parks).

Moose Deer Point First Nation

Capacity Building and Habitat Inventory at Six Nations to Support Management and Protection of Species at Risk

Trough landowner contact and an expert research team, this project proposes to inventory species at risk and habitats on the 11 000 hectares of Six Nations with an emphasis on plant species. The project is being developed in partnership with Kayanase, a native plant restoration business focused on “Restoring Mother Earth.” Data will be collected and entered into a secure Geographic Information System (GIS) database system to provide a benchmark for the protection and monitoring of wild species and habitats at Six Nations.

Grand River Employment and Training Inc.

Species at Risk Inventory and Capacity-building Project: Cape Croker and the Nawash Hunting Grounds (Bruce Peninsula)

The Chippewas of Nawash First Nation are appreciative of the gifts that have been bestowed upon them by the Great Spirit; are aware of their obligation to act as stewards of those gifts; and are committed to protecting them for the present and future generations. In order to meet this mandate, a Species At Risk (SAR) inventory and information project was launched in 2007-08 within the Nawash Territory. The long-term goal of this project is to produce a conservation planning atlas, which will include information on target species within the territory, maps, biological data regarding the target species and traditional knowledge (TK). The band will be able to use the information contained in the atlas as it strives to protect the target species and their critical habitat.

Chippewas of Nawash Unceded First Nation

Phase 2: Detailed Confirmatory Species at Risk Identification, Mapping, and Final Phase of Development of a Species At Risk Protocol

The primary objective of this project is to protect and enhance the natural heritage of the Georgina Island First Nation. To this end, it will identify species at risk and their habitat and other environmentally sensitive areas within reserve lands so that those areas can be accurately defined, preserved, protected or improved upon using a mapping tool and protocols. The intention of the project is to maintain a healthy ecosystem for wildife species at risk as well as community members, cottagers, and surrounding communities, while ensuring that the natural and cultural heritage are not lost or compromised.

Chippewas of Georgina Island First Nation

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Prairie and Northern Region 2008–2009

Inuit Participation in a Training Workshop to Build SARA Capacity in Nunavut

The Nunavut Inuit Wildlife Secretariat, along with members of two or three Hunters and Trappers Organizations (HTOs) in Nunavut, will attend a pilot training workshop developed by the federal government on the Species at Risk Act (SARA). The goal of the workshop is to provide information on how to actively engage in the SARA listing process and participate in the development and implementation of recovery documents and funding proposals. This knowledge will enable attendees to educate HTOs and communities on how SARAworks and help them to get involved in SARA programs in ways that benefit both Nunavummiut and wildlife species at risk.

Nunavut Inuit Wildlife Secretariat

Southern Saskatchewan Critical Habitat Protection Plan

The Southern Saskatchewan Critical Habitat Protection Project will be delivered by several organizations that have developed a working partnership and it will cover seven species at risk and their habitats on First Nations lands. The projects will recognize the environmental needs of the existing species at risk and their habitats and focus on encouraging agricultural practices that protect and support the development of healthy habitat. This project will focus on protecting the habitats of species at risk and on creating awareness among landowners to encourage stewardship of the land and habitat of these species.

First Nations Agricultural Council of Saskatchewan Inc. (FNACS)

2008-2009 Species at Risk Pathfinder Initiative (Manitoba and Saskatchewan)

The 2008-2009 Species at Risk (SAR) Pathfinder Initiative in Manitoba and Saskatchewan will increase awareness and participation of First Nations in species at risk issues, processes, and stewardship. This will be accomplished by developing and distributing SAR communication tools, including newsletters and information packages, as well as classroom materials, including lesson plans, games, and calendars. The goals of the program will also be reached by delivering SAR presentations and technical workshops and by assisting First Nations to become engaged in projects for the protection and recovery of species at risk and their critical habitat within their territories.

Centre for Indigenous Environmental Resources (CIER)

Building Capacity among Future Generations for Sturgeon Stewardship

In the Earth’s life cycles, “what goes around comes around.” The primary focus of this project is to engage young people in sturgeon conservation. The sustainability of the sturgeon for present and future generations is threatened by overfishing, while its very survival is in peril due to the destruction of its habitat from hydro-electric flooding. The Nelson River Sturgeon Board (NRSB) has two management goals: to encourage communities to harvest less of the breeding stock and to increase sturgeon numbers by hatching, rearing and releasing fingerlings. This project will require resources to raise awareness of the issues among fishers, elders, leaders, schools and students and the general public in the NRSB communities, and to mobilize their commitment to these initiatives.

Nelson River Sturgeon Board

Describing and Mapping Critical Polar Bear Habitat using Inuit Knowledge – Foxe Basin, Nunavut

The Kivalliq Inuit Association will collect Inuit knowledge of critical Polar Bear habitat and seasonal sea ice habitat availability on the Foxe Basin Polar Bear population. This information will be used to map and describe the environmental characteristics of the species’ denning, summer retreat and sea ice habitats. The results will be entered into habitat models and explored as a new approach incorporating traditional ecological knowledge and conventional research to support protection of species at risk habitats.

Kivalliq Inuit Association

Building First Nation Capacity for Habitat and Species Monitoring: The Traditional Lands of Bloodvein River First Nation

This project is the first stage of a monitoring program for species at risk (SAR). The aim is to identify critical habitat for Woodland Caribou, Wolverine, Lake Sturgeon, and Red-headed Woodpecker within Bloodvein River trap lines in Manitoba. The input of First Nations members is critical to the project as interviews with elders, trappers and land users about species sightings and habitat use will be entered into a geographic information system (GIS) to create a map of the areas used by wildlife. The design for a species at risk monitoring program will include input from the Manitoba SAR Recovery Team for Woodland Caribou and information will be shared with the provincial and national recovery programs for species at risk.

Bloodvein River First Nation

Traditional Knowledge Referral System

The Tall Cree First Nation is currently gathering knowledge about its traditional land use area. This data will be combined with past data and entered into a secure Internet-based Traditional Knowledge Referral System to allow interactive exploration of map and text data, as well as the mapping of specific components (e.g. a particular species). Searching for and selecting portions of transcribed interviews specific to a particular subject for reporting will also be supported. The completed project will offer software and associated documentation for use or modification. Following completion of this project, a specific training curriculum and certification program will be produced to enable other communities to derive maximum benefit from the software.

Tall Cree First Nation

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Pacific and Yukon Region 2008–2009

Garry Oak Ecosystem and Other Plant Species-at-risk Mapping Inventory and Assessment in T’Sou-ke Nation Traditional Territory

This project will be a combination of environmental science capacity building, data collection and traditional knowledge research of plant species at risk in the T’Sou-ke Nation territory. The project will use a geographic information system (GIS) to map habitat locations and vegetation analysis to gather biological data on the different species. The end result of the project will be a final report with research, traditional knowledge, maps of habitat and biological data of each plant species at risk in the T’Sou-ke traditional territory. Species studied will include Garry Oak-associated ecosystem plants as well as other plant species at risk in the T’Sou-ke Nation territory.

T'Sou-ke Nation

Multi-jurisdictional Restoration of Coastal Dune Landforms at Cordova Spit

The Cordova Shore dune ecosystem contains significant remnants of rare coastal sand dunes and habitats of great conservation interest, with a characteristic and rich flora and fauna. Cordova Shore comprises the largest contiguous dune system in southern British Columbia and is one of the best examples of an intact dune system in the province. The Cordova Shore ecosystem is important to the Tsawout community for traditional and cultural reasons. The Shore offers many educational opportunities for community members and is an important educational resource for the Saanich Tribal School.

Dunes at Cordova Shore are being severely degraded by uncontrolled public access, which also facilitates the introduction and range extension of invasive species, such as Scotch Broom. Collaboration by the three jurisdictions offers an important opportunity to protect and restore the natural and cultural features of this rare ecosystem, and to tell an important story to the many visitors that use and enjoy the area.

Tsawout First Nation

Capacity Building for Environmental Monitoring of the Effectiveness of Rockfish Conservation Areas

Nuu-chah-nulth fisheries guardians and technicians are contributing to Rockfish conservation and recovery by undertaking biological monitoring of local Rockfish populations. Through classroom activities and field training, Nuu-chah-nulth participants will build capacity in (1) Rockfish species ID techniques (as well as which Rockfish species are currently listed or will be considered for listing under SARA and why), and in (2) biosampling and ecological monitoring methods for Rockfish. A Rockfish monitoring program will be initiated in Barkley Sound, in cooperation with Fisheries and Oceans Canada.

Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council

Traditional Ecological Knowledge, Ethno-Ecological Restoration and Community Education – Cordova Shore Dune Ecosystem

This multi-jurisdictional partnership project involves collaboration in the culturally sensitive restoration and management of a rare and fragile dune ecosystem at Cordova Spit by three landowning jurisdictions supported by federal and provincial conservation agencies and the University of Victoria. The landowning jurisdictions are the Tsawout First Nation, Capital Regional District Parks and Central Saanich Municipal Parks. Cooperating agencies include the British Columbia Ministry of Environment and Environment Canada’s Canadian Wildlife Service.

Tsawout First Nation

2008–2009 McKinley Creek Juvenile Coho Habitat Utilization and Outmigration

The goal of the 2008 McKinley Creek Juvenile Coho Habitat Utilization and Outmigration project is to address knowledge gaps identified by the Interior Fraser Coho (IFC) recovery team and enable the Northern Secwepemc te Qelmucw to play an instrumental role in the recovery of IFC. To accomplish this, the Northern Shuswap Tribal Council (NSTC) Fisheries Department will operate a rotary screw trap from April to June 2008, collecting data that will determine, but not be limited to, juvenile outmigration behaviour patterns and population estimates. As well, the NSTC Fisheries Department will study the McKinley Creek Watershed from August 2008 to February 2009, identifying distribution and preferred areas of habitat utilization through the late summer, winter and early spring. Additional data collected will be abundance data and physiological data, such as growth of the juveniles through the season.

Northern Shuswap Tribal Council

2008 McKinley Creek Juvenile Coho Salmon Outmigration

The goal of the 2008 McKinley Creek Juvenile Outmigration project is to address knowledge gaps identified by the Interior Fraser Coho (IFC) recovery team and enable the Northern Secwepemc te Qelmucw to play an instrumental role in the recovery of IFC from their current state. To accomplish this, the Northern Shuswap Tribal Council (NSTC) Fisheries Department will operate a rotary screw trap from April to June 2008, collecting data that will determine, but not be limited to, juvenile outmigration behaviour patterns and estimates of population.

Northern Shuswap Tribal Council

Cariboo Region Badger Recovery Plan on Canoe Creek Indian Reserve Lands Aboriginal Capacity Building Fund (ACBF)

The Canoe Creek Indian Band, the British Columbia Ministry of Environment and Thompson River University will continue to coordinate the Cariboo Region American Badger Project. The Cariboo Region Badger Recovery Plan goal is to evaluate all post-2003 work and continue with current recovery strategies in ongoing research projects to identify badger recovery and mortality rates. In a joint effort, we have identified 817 badger burrows within the study area. Through continuing research, we will revisit identified badger habitat areas, trap and capture a select number of badgers and place radio transmitter collars on them to monitor their behavioural movements through their territorial environment. American Badgers are known to travel in a territory with a 200-mile radius. How is the encroachment of human settlement and domestic animal activities affecting the mortality rate of these red-listed species-at-risk candidates? Through this joint research project, the British Columbia Ministry of Environment, Thompson River University and the Canoe Creek Indian Band will conduct additional research on the Cariboo Region American Badger .

Canoe Creek Indian Band

Identification and Conservation Planning for Species at Risk at Shackan Indian Reserve 11 (Phase 2)

The Shackan Indian Band is located in the Nicola Valley along Highway 8 between Merritt and Spences Bridge. The potential exists for several species at risk, including the Western Rattlesnake (among other snake species), which is known to be found in this area of the province and on territorial lands. Two major threats to the Western Rattlesnake populations include snake mortality as a result of roadkill and –public persecution. The aim of the project is to reduce human-snake conflicts on Aboriginal lands by increasing community knowledge of these species and by providing strategies to balance the ecological, economic and social needs of the Shackan Indian Band.

Shackan Indian Band

Assessing Juvenile White Sturgeon (Nechako) Habitat Use/Preference, and Monitoring Juvenile Survival and Distribution, AND Furthering First Nations' Involvement in Hatchery Operationalization and Brood Stock Capture and Spawning – 2008 Nechako White Sturgeon Hatchery Operations

For the juvenile habitat use component of this project, the Nechako River will be surveyed utilizing gillnets, traps and angling for the purposes of capturing and sampling juvenile White Sturgeon (ages 1–10).

For the hatchery operations component of this project, up to 5 First Nations stechnicians from communities within the Nechako watershed will work with the Freshwater Fisheries Society of BC (FFSBC) staff (and other recovery initiative partners) on activities associated with the collection and spawning of White Sturgeon brood stock for planned 2008 Nechako White Sturgeon hatchery operations, as well as spawn monitoring activities. These individuals provide a vital link to local First Nations communities and their knowledge of the hatchery operations and the recovery initiative, and maintaining and building support for conserving the stock and supporting recovery objectives/actions. The recovery initiative also involves personnel from the municipality of Vanderhoof, and individuals from other agencies and organizations. The proposed work provides increased opportunities for local First Nations to work directly with these groups, and is fundamental to allowing conservation-based fish culture activities on the Nechako's White Sturgeon stock to continue.

Carrier Sekani Tribal Council (CSTC)

Critical Habitat Identification and Refinement of Population Status Assessment – Upper Fraser White Sturgeon

The Upper Fraser White Sturgeon stock is one of the smallest and most genetically unique components of the White Sturgeon species. The population has a healthy age structure, but its small size makes it susceptible to habitat degradation and population declines due to unpredictable or chance environmental events in combination with human-related activities. Via sampling and telemetry, the critical habitats of this stock group will continue to be identified and refined so that their protection can be assured long into the future. The status of the population will be assessed using the existing marked component of the population to ensure it is maintaining a healthy structure. Lheidli T’enneh will continue to build its capacity and community awareness for the purpose of conserving the stock.

Lheidli T'enneh Band

Gitga’at Northern Abalone Recovery Program

The overall purpose of this project is to reverse the continued decline of the threatened abalone population within the Gitga'at Territory through active enforcement projects. The immediate short-term outcome of this project is to patrol identified critical habitats to observe activities, deter illegal harvest and report suspicious behaviour and observations to Fisheries and Oceans Canada enforcement staff. We will also join the important coastwide team involved in developing and implementing abalone recovery in British Columbia.

Gitga'at Lands and Resources Stewardship Society

Akisq'nuk First Nation Assessment of Columbia Lake Indian Reserve 3 for Multi-species-at-Risk Values

Columbia Lake Indian Reserve (IR) 3 is located in the Interior Douglas-fir Biogeoclimatic Zone, the second warmest forested zone of the dry southern interior of British Columbia. Preliminary research conducted as a result of previous environmental work indicates Columbia Lake IR 3 may provide habitat to a number of species at risk, including one endangered species, the American Badger (Taxidea taxus jeffersonii subspecies) and the following species, listed as special concern: the Flammulated Owl, the Lewis's Woodpecker, the Long-billed Curlew, the Monarch, the Rubber Boa, the Western Toad and the Yellow Rail. The objective of this project is to provide an inventory of species at risk and their habitat on IR 3, together with strategies to mitigate potential adverse impacts on these species and their habitats that may result from future development initiatives. The project goal is to provide a foundation for ?akisq'nuk First Nation decision-makers to make sustainable land use decisions while integrating economic, social and species-at-risk values on reserve lands.

Akisq'nuk First Nation

Northern Mountain Caribou Management Plan Participation and Capacity-building Project

The First Nation communities of the Northern Nation Alliance, White River Yukon, and the Treaty 8 Tribal Association are engaging in a community exercise that is intended to help member communities talk and gather knowledge about local Northern Mountain Caribou herds. Information that is shared and captured during the exercise can help provide the capacity and opportunity for the participating First Nation communities to comment on the Northern Mountain Caribou Plan.

Treaty 8

Lillooet Tribal Council Species at Risk Act Capacity-building Project

The Lillooet Tribal Council (LTC) will contract a project coordinator to conduct an assessment of the species listed by COSEWICand the Species at Risk Act (SARA) within the reserves and traditional St'at'imc territory. Information will be compiled and form the basis for a LTC SARA strategic plan. There will be an interview process conducted with community resource persons and outreach with various recovery teams and conservation groups and agencies. The ultimate objective is to provide long-term conservation measures for all SARA species in the St'at'imc territory.

Lillooet Tribal Council

Stó:lō Species at Risk Capacity-building Pilot – Community Stewardship Apprenticeship Project

The Sockeye Salmon Cultus population recovery is considered a model for related stewardship partnerships involving other Lower Fraser River area bands. Specifically, this project will seek to develop capacity from among the eight member bands to become effectively involved in regional stewardship activities. The fieldwork will target individualized training objectives for members of the Stó:lō Tribal Council, but courses and collaborative projects will be open to all Lower Fraser First Nations within the prescribed class-size limits. Rebuilding local fisheries in partnership with both government and non-governmental groups provides an opportunity for both healthier ecosystems and healthier communities.

Stó:lō Tribal Council Society

Field Assessment of Dry Ecosystem Species-at-risk Project

The Lower Nicola Indian Band (LNIB) has a total of 10 reserves throughout the Nicola Valley in British Columbia, totaling more than 7082 ha of land. The LNIB Natural Resource Department is developing field truth suitability models for 14 species at risk. The results of the field truthing will support the development of best management practices and recovery strategies for the LNIB reserve. Project results will be presented to Chief and Council members, and on the band website at www.lnib.net.

Lower Nicola Indian Band

Furthering First Nations’ Involvement in Hatchery Operationalization and Brood Stock Capture and Spawning – 2008 Nechako White Sturgeon Hatchery Operations

As many as five First Nations technicians from communities within the Nechako watershed will work with Freshwater Fisheries Society of BC staff (and other recovery initiative partners) on activities associated with the collection and spawning of White Sturgeon brood stock for planned 2008 Nechako White Sturgeon hatchery operations, as well as spawn monitoring activities. These individuals provide a vital link to local First Nations communities and their knowledge of the hatchery operations and the recovery initiative, and maintaining and building support for conserving the stock and supporting recovery objectives/actions. The recovery initiative also involves the personnel from the municipality of Vanderhoof, and individuals from other agencies and organizations. The proposed work provides increased opportunities for local First Nations to work directly with these groups, and is fundamental in allowing conservation-based fish culture activities on the Nechako's White Sturgeon stock to continue.

Carrier Sekani Tribal Council (CSTC)

Okanagan Nation Capacity Initiative for Upper Columbia Sturgeon

The Okanagan Nation Alliance Fisheries Department’s goal and mandate is to conserve, protect, restore and enhance Aboriginal fisheries (anadromous and resident) and aquatic resources within Okanagan Nation territory. As a result, the ONAFD would like to develop capacity to manage and develop projects srelating to White Sturgeon in the Upper Columbia area. The Sturgeon biologist will work on research in the basin, as well as proposal development, communication with members of the community and future restoration and fish passage works.

Okanagan Nation Alliance

Gitxaala Abalone Recovery Program

The overall purpose of this project is to reverse the continued decline of the threatened abalone population within the Gitxaala territory through active community engagements and surveying projects. Our immediate short-term outcomes for this project are to work within the First Nations community and the scientific community to reduce the number of illegally harvested abalone. A secondary project is to identify critical habitats in order to set up long-term monitoring sites there and collect the baseline data needed for rebuilding projects.

The long-term goal of our project is to contribute to the combined efforts of other north coast First Nations communities to remove abalone from the threatened status list and to allow them to be harvested again for food and social and ceremonial purposes by increasing their densities to self-sustainable levels.

Gitxaala First Nation

Species at Risk Conference: Transforming Our Traditions into Management Plans

The Transforming Our Traditions into Management Plans Conference, with its workshops, will be a catalyst for proactive management planning that will incorporate Aboriginal approaches throughout the Interior Plateau. By bringing First Nation groups together with their western scientific counterparts, it is hoped that an exchange of alternative relationship views can become a vehicle for expanded management planning, not only for SARA species and listed endangered species, but also those species associated with them.

Esh-kn-am Cultural Resources Management Services

Developing Land Trust Acquisitions

This project will continue the work to preserve, protect and enhance the quality of the human and natural environment as well as promote a special land conservancy model based on an environmental covenant to develop knowledge about and respect for the natural environment. Our intent is to play a positive and meaningful role in protecting our natural environment for present and future generations.

One of the main project objectives is to develop a new methodology of protecting existing endangered habitat through implementation of a First Nations Land Trust (FNLT) land conservancy model, some of which is unique to Indian reserve lands. The unique legal status of First Nations land, including land subject to the continuing exercise of First Nation rights, necessitates that unique and creative solutions be devised in order to protect these endangered areas.

First Nations Land Trust

Splatsin First Nation Grassland Species-at-risk Surveys

The Splatsin First Nation has initiated an inventory of species at risk on Indian reserve lands to help meet the mandates of the Species at Risk Act. The American Badger Project will inventory and map known burrow sites (dens), foraging habitats and potential habitat of other species at risk such as the Great Basin Gopher Snakes on Splatsin reserve lands. The project will also determine the distribution and estimate the number of American Badgers on Splatsin reserve lands. Anecdotal sightings of other species at risk will also be collected. The findings will be summarized and management plans for these species will be generated to outline measures and recommendations that will mitigate impacts to preserve and protect American Badgers and other grassland species.

Splatsin First Nation

Assessment and Increased Community Awareness of White Sturgeon and Threatened Salmonid Species in Shefford Slough Surrounding Shxwhá:y Village

This project involves education and the restoration of White Sturgeon habitat in Shefford Slough surrounding Shxwhá:y Village. Project objectives would include increasing community awareness of White Sturgeon and their habitat, training band members to participate in the project, habitat restoration in areas surrounding Shefford Slough and development of prescriptions for future improvement in the quality of Shefford Slough.

Shxwhá:y Village

The Musqueam Ecosystem Pacific Water Shrew Critical Habitat Protection Project

The Musqueam Ecosystem Pacific Water Shrew Critical Habitat Protection Project will work through scientific and traditional ecological knowledge towards the recovery of the endangered Pacific Water Shrew within the Musqueam Creek Ecosystem. The Musqueam Creek Ecosystem is Vancouver's largest green space and the last remaining home for the Pacific Water Shrew and wild Coho Salmon in the city. The plight of these two species is interconnected as they both depend upon the protection of streamside riparian and in-stream aquatic habitat. Through our efforts we will protect and restore sensitive riparian and in-stream habitat, ensuring that both the Pacific Water Shrew and wild Coho Salmon survive in Vancouver for future generations to experience.

Musqueam Ecosystem Conservation Society

Aboriginal Capacity BuildingFund

The Species at Risk Pathfinder Initiative (British Columbia Region) for 2008–2009 will focus on building capacity for First Nation bands and organizations in British Columbia. This involves but is not limited to

  1. identifying sources of local, provincial and federal funding;
  2. identifying technical service organizations relevant to a community undertaking a species-at-risk initiative;
  3. identifying relevant local, provincial and national conservation and stewardship programs and activities to use as resources;
  4. meeting with communities to provide advice and guidance on project design and management;
  5. assisting groups with funding proposals; and
  6. developing strategies for incorporating traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) into the species-at-risk process.

Okanagan Nation Alliance

Development of a Species-at-risk Database for the Collection, Mapping and Archiving of Métis Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge in British Columbia

The Development of a Species-at-risk Database for the Collection, Mapping and Archiving of Métis Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge in British Columbia project will develop a species-at-risk database and mapping tool, both constructed by Heilala Consulting and housed at the University of British Columbia-Okanagan. Furthermore, the project will ensure that the database and mapping tools meet the research criteria of the Métis Nation British Columbia - Natural Resource Act and that all data populating these systems will be properly archived.

Métis Nation British Columbia (MNBC)

Identification of Wildlife Habitat Patches and Corridors in a Semi-urban Landscape on the Shuswap Indian Reserve, Invermere, British Columbia

The goal will be to address species-at-risk issues and related wildlife and fisheries issues in the broader context of integrated planning related to the potential development of reserve lands of the Shuswap Indian Band in the Invermere area. The primary purpose of the study is to identify wildlife movement routes that can be aligned with existing regional movement corridors, or local movement corridors and natural reserve areas on adjacent lands, such as those planned at Eagle Ranch. This work will complement and extend the badger mitigation planning work completed by Stone Creek Properties for their leased development at Eagle Ranch. The project will include capacity building within the band.

Kinbasket Development Corporation

Kluane Baikal Sedge Inventory Project

The federal government has initiated recovery planning for Baikal Sedge and requires the support of First Nations to prepare a recovery strategy and action plan and to lay out recovery activities to ensure the future of the species. Very little is known about this species, including where it may be found within our traditional territory. Very few species in Yukon are listed under the Species at Risk Act (SARA) and recovery planning under the legislation is new to all jurisdictions (federal, territorial, First Nation). First Nations in Yukon have many other interests and work to do, so in order for us to be able to participate in recovery planning and action for the species, we seek support to raise awareness, foster participation and build additional capacity for inter-jurisdictional species conservation under SARA.

Kluane First Nation

C/TFN Baikal Sedge Research and Inventory

The federal government has initiated recovery planning for Baikal Sedge and requires the support of First Nations to prepare a recovery strategy and action plan and to lay out recovery activities to ensure the future of the species. Very little is known about this species, including where it may be found within our traditional territory. Very few species in Yukon are listed under the Species at Risk Act (SARA) and recovery planning under the legislation is new to all jurisdictions (federal, territorial, First Nation). First Nations in Yukon have many other interests and work to do, so in order for us to be able to participate in recovery planning and action for the species, we seek support to raise awareness, foster participation and build additional capacity for inter-jurisdictional species conservation under SARA.

Carcross/Tagish First Nation

Champagne and Aishihik Baikal Sedge Conservation Project

The federal government has initiated recovery planning for Baikal Sedge and requires the support of First Nations to prepare a recovery strategy and action plan and to lay out recovery activities to ensure the future of the species. Very little is known about this species, including where it may be found within our traditional territory. Very few species in Yukon are listed under the Species at Risk Act (SARA) and recovery planning under the legislation is new to all jurisdictions (federal, territorial, First Nation). First Nations in Yukon have many other interests and work to do, so in order for us to be able to participate in recovery planning and action for the species, we seek support to raise awareness, foster participation and build additional capacity for inter-jurisdictional species conservation under SARA.

Champagne and Aishihik First Nations

Heiltsuk Fisheries Program Whale Project

The project aims to create a better understanding of the habitat use requirements and behaviour of Humpback Whales and Killer Whales within the central coast. This will involve conducting field studies to locate and identify individuals, collecting traditional ecological knowledge-based information about these species and the development of community education and involvement initiatives.

Heiltsuk Fisheries Program

Secwepemc Communities Species-at-risk Management Plan – Aboriginal Capacity Building

The project involves the Secwepemc communities through meetings, additions to a database, and planning documents to identify current and historical occurrences of species at risk (SARs) on their lands, as well as the cultural and traditional importance of these species. Information will be collected, recorded and compiled into a database designed for ongoing (future) use. Information from the database will be compiled into a planning document designed to outline future objectives, recommendations, management and land use planning for SAR species.

Splatsin First Nation

Upper Nicola Band Field Evaluation of Burrowing Owl Habitat

The Upper Nicola Band (UNB) plans to complete field assessments of ecological and cultural habitat models for the Burrowing Owl. The reserve lands of the UNBtotal more than 12 503.2 ha, of which a considerable portion is composed of grassland habitat suitable for species at risk. The results of the field assessment will support the development of best management practices for inclusion in the band’s future land use planning objectives. Project updates will be presented on the band’s website at www.uppernicolaband.com.

Upper Nicola Band

SARA Curriculum Implementation for Haida Youth

Haida participation in species-at-risk (SAR) planning is key to project success on Haida Gwaii. Yet a comprehensive understanding of SAR and the opportunities associated with wildlife work are rare. Haida youth are the immediate future labour pool that will either engage in SAR-led initiatives, or unknowingly ignore them altogether. Without adequate planning and capacity building, the proposed species likely face extinction within the lifespan of these same Haida youth. We propose to build upon our successes both as Council of the Haida Nation technical support and Haida Gwaii educators, and bring these species in a curriculum package to Haida Gwaii secondary students through a combination of in-class and field modules, fully designed and led by experienced staff, in partnership with a number of organizations.

Secretariat of the Haida Nation

First Nations' participation in White Sturgeon recovery

This project involves: (i) research on historic movement patterns of White Sturgeon currently resident in the Arrow Lakes and genetically related downstream fish; and (ii) First Nations participation in the development and implementation of recovery strategies for the Species at Risk Act-listed endangered White Sturgeon.

Ktunaxa Nation Council

Metlakatla Abalone Aggregation Study

The overall purpose of this project is to reverse the continued decline of the threatened abalone population in the Metlakatla Territory through active rebuilding projects. Our immediate short-term outcome of this project is to work within identified critical habitats to set up long-term monitoring sites in these habitats and to collect the baseline data needed for rebuilding projects. This will immediately be followed by aggregation studies, based on previous methodology, to increase abalone recruitment.

Metlakatla Band

Gitga’at Cetacean Critical Habitat Identification and Protection

Threatened Humpback and Killer Whales are vulnerable to numerous human stressors. Current and proposed industrial developments within the Gitga’at territory risk exacerbating many of these stressors within critical habitats of these species. Our project will contribute to the protection and recovery of Humpback and Killer Whales by identifying enhanced protection measures and improving our understanding of critical habitats.

Gitga'at Lands and Resources Stewardship Society

Exploring, Promoting and Enabling Landowner Participation in the Spalding’s Campion's Recovery

This project will further improve the chances of the survival of the population of Spalding’s Campion, a species with only two populations in Canada, one on the Tobacco Plains Indian Reserve and the other on adjacent private land. Through this project the landowner and First Nation will be encouraged to participate in the recovery of the Spalding’s Campion through the identification of effective protection, best management practices and communicating this information to neighboring responsible jurisdictions.

Tobacco Plains Indian Band

Songhees Nation Tool Development for Strategic Planning for the Protection of the Garry Oak Ecosystem

At the current rate of decline, time is running out for us to firmly grasp our remaining resources and to develop an action plan to address the need for effective policies and laws for land protection and resource management. The time has come for us to work together to restore a culturally significant ecosystem for the benefit of generations to come. This project, along with the First Nations Lands Management Initiative, will assist in the protection and restoration of important resources within the Garry Oak ecosystem.

Songhees First Nation