Species at Risk Act Legal listing consultation workbook

North Atlantic Right Whale

(Eubalaena glacialis)

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Addition of species to the Species at Risk Act

Introductory Information

The Species at Risk Act

The Species at Risk Act (SARA) strengthens and enhances the Government of Canada’s capacity to protect Canadian wildlife species,subspecies and distinct populations that are at risk of becoming Extinct or Extirpated. The Act applies only to species on the SARA list.

Openness and transparency, including public consultation, is required in making decisions about which species should be included on the SARA list. The process begins with the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) assessing a species as being at risk. Upon receipt of these assessments, the Minister of the Environment, in consultation with the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans, has 90 days to report on how he or she intends to respond to the assessment and to the extent possible, provide timelines for action. Subsequent to the consultative process, a recommendation to the Governor in Council on whether to add certain species to the SARA list or to refer them back to COSEWIC is generated. Once a species is added to the SARA list, specific actions must be taken within specified time periods to help ensure that species’ protection and recovery. 

Public Consultation

The Government of Canada proclaimed the Species at Risk Act on June 5, 2003 as part of its strategy for the protection of wildlife species at risk. Attached to the Act is Schedule 1, the list of the species that receive protection under SARA, commonly referred to as the ‘SARA list’.

The existing SARA list reflects the 233 species the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) had assessed and found to be at risk at the time of the reintroduction of SARA to the House of Commons on October 9th , 2002.

Role of COSEWIC

COSEWIC comprises experts on wildlife species at risk. Their backgrounds are in the fields of biology, ecology, genetics, aboriginal traditional knowledge and other relevant fields, and they come from various communities, including government, academia, Aboriginal organizations and non-government organizations.

Initially, COSEWIC commissions a Status Report for the evaluation of the conservation status of a species. To be accepted, status reports must be peer-reviewed and approved by a subcommittee of species specialists. In special circumstances assessments can be done on an emergency basis.

COSEWIC then meets to examine the status report, discuss the species and determine whether or not the species is at risk, and if so, assess the level of risk. For more information on COSEWIC visit www.cosewic.gc.ca

Terms used to define the degree of risk to a species

The degree of risk is categorized according to the terms Extirpated, Endangered, Threatened and Special Concern. A species is assessed by COSEWIC as Extirpated when it is no longer found in the wild in Canada but still exists elsewhere. It is Endangered if it is facing imminent extirpation or extinction. An assessment of Threatened means that the species is likely to become Endangered if nothing is done to reverse the factors leading to  its extirpation or extinction. COSEWIC assesses a species as Special Concern if it may become a Threatened or Endangered species because of a combination of biological characteristics and identified threats.

New Assessments

Since October 9th, 2002, COSEWIC has assessed or reassessed additional species as being at risk, making them eligible for addition to the SARA list. Of these species, 28 are aquatic and are therefore the responsibility of the Department of Fisheries and Oceans. The remaining 63 species are the responsibility of Environment Canada. For more information on the Environment Canada consultations please see the SARA Public Registry: www.sararegistry.gc.ca

Nearly 40 per cent of the 91 species currently being considered for listing occur in parks administered by the Parks Canada Agency. Responsibility for those species (both terrestrial and aquatic) that occur within parks, is shared between the Parks Canada Agency and either Environment Canada or Fisheries and Oceans Canada.

SARA has been designed to conserve Canadian wildlife species and the habitats that support them. Public involvement is integral to the processes of listing species as being at risk and protecting Canadian wildlife. The best way to secure the survival of species at risk and their habitats is through the active participation of all those concerned. As such, your comments on this document will be given serious consideration.

Purpose of the consultation

Having received the COSEWIC assessment of the species’ status, the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans must provide the Minister of the Environment with a recommendation to the Governor in Council. This recommendation must be one of the following:

  • that the COSEWIC assessment be accepted and the species be added to the SARA list;
  • that the species not be added to the SARA list; or
  • that the species be referred back to COSEWIC for further information or consideration.

The Government of Canada is required to take one of these actions within nine months of the Governor in Council having received the assessment from the Minister of the Environment.

COSEWIC bases its assessments solely on the biological status of each species. However, consultation with Canadians regarding the potential impacts of the addition of each species to the SARA list will occur before the government of Canada arrives at informed decisions on listing. Of particular interest in these consultations is identification of the benefits and costs of adding each of the species to the list relative to the potential impacts on these species and on society of not adding them.

Therefore, before the government makes decisions regarding the SARA list, affected Canadians will have the opportunity to express their views and concerns. This consultation allows those affected to contribute to the government decision-making process.

Role and impact of public consultation

The results of this public consultation are of great relevance to the entire process of listing species at risk. The comments received will be carefully reviewed and evaluated. They will then be documented in a Regulatory Impact Analysis Statement (RIAS). The RIAS is an integral part of the federal regulatory process and is published with all regulatory proposals in the Canada Gazette Part I.

Following initial consultations, a draft Order (an instrument that serves notice of a decision taken by the executive arm of government) proposing to list all or some of the species under consideration will be prepared. This draft Order will be published along with the RIAS in the Canada Gazette Part I for a comment period. Based on the outcome of the comment period, a recommendation to the Governor in Council on whether to add certain species to the SARA list or to refer them back to COSEWIC will be generated. The final decision will be published in Canada Gazette Part II and on the Public Registry.

Significance of the addition of a species to the SARA list

The protection that comes into effect following the addition of a species to the SARA list depends upon the degree of risk assigned to that species.

Protection for listed Extirpated, Endangered and Threatened species

Under the Act, prohibitions protect individuals of Extirpated, Endangered and Threatened species. These prohibitions make it an offence to kill, harm, harass, capture or take an individual of a species listed as Extirpated, Endangered or Threatened, or to damage or destroy the residence of one or more individuals of an Endangered or a Threatened species. The Act also makes it an offence to possess, collect, buy, sell or trade an individual of a species that is Extirpated, Endangered or Threatened or a part or derivative of one. These prohibitions will come into force for the SARA listed species on June 1st, 2004. The focus of protection will be on those species for which the federal government has direct legal authority. The protection will be in force for all listed birds protected under the Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994 and for listed aquatic species. The prohibitions will also apply to all listed species on federal lands.

For all other listed Endangered, Threatened and Extirpated species, the provinces and territories have the responsibility to ensure that they receive adequate protection.

Exceptions to the prohibitions on aquatic species may be authorized by the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans, provided that the survival or recovery of the species is not jeopardised. The Ministers may enter into agreements or issue permits only for (1) research relating to the conservation of a species or (2) for activities that benefit a listed species or enhance its chances of survival or (3) that incidentally affect a listed species.

Protection for listed species of Special Concern

The prohibitions of SARA for species listed as Extirpated, Endangered and Threatened will not apply to species of Special Concern; however any existing protections and prohibitions, such as those authorized by the Migratory Birds Convention Actor the Canada National Parks Act, continue to be in force.

Recovery strategies and action plans for Extirpated, Endangered and Threatened species

The addition of an Extirpated, Endangered or Threatened species to the SARA list triggers the requirement for the preparation of a recovery strategy and action plan which will be the subject of separate consultations.  Recovery strategies will be completed and made available on the SARA Public Registry to allow for public review and comment, within one year for Endangered and within two years for Threatened and Extirpated newly listed species.

Recovery strategies will address the known threats to the species and its habitat. They will identify areas where more research is needed and population objectives that will help ensure the species’ survival or recovery, and will include a statement of the timeframe. Recovery strategies and action plans will identify, to the extent possible, the critical habitat of the species. Action plans will include measures to address threats, help the species recover and protect critical habitat. Measures to implement the recovery strategy will also be identified in the action plan.

Recovery strategies and action plans will be prepared in cooperation with aboriginal organizations, responsible jurisdictions, and relevant management boards directly affected by them. Stakeholders affected by the recovery strategy will also be consulted.

Management plans for Species of Special Concern

For species of Special Concern, management plans will be prepared and made available on the Public Registry within three years of their addition to the SARA list, allowing for public review and comment. Management plans will include appropriate conservation measures for the species and for its habitat.

Management plans will be prepared in cooperation with aboriginal organizations, responsible jurisdictions, and relevant management boards directly affected by them. Stakeholders affected by the management plan will also be consulted.

Public comments solicited on the addition of species to the SARA list

The species described in this workbook has been assessed or reassessed by COSEWIC as a species at risk, and is being considered for addition to the SARA list. Please complete the survey beginning on page nine and return in person or by regular mail to the address below. In order to consider your comments, responses are required no later than May 30, 2004.

Species at Risk Coordination Office
Bedford Institute of Oceanography
P.O. Box 1006
1 Challenger Drive
Dartmouth, NS
B2Y 4A2

Alternatively, please e-mail your comments (with the species name in the subject line) to: XMARSARA@mar.dfo-mpo.gc.ca

Your comments will be reviewed and used to consider whether or not to place each species on the SARA list.

Species specific information

The North Atlantic right whale

The North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis) is a large, slow moving baleen whale. Adult males are generally 14 metres in length and females are slightly larger: 16 to 17 metres. Right Whales are dark grey to black in colour and can be distinguished from other baleen whales by the distinctive V shaped blow and lack of a dorsal fin. Skin growths on the head called “callosities” are unique and can be used to identify individual whales.

In the western North Atlantic, the right whale is found between Florida and  Newfoundland, and occasionally in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. In the spring, the species begins a migration northwards from the coast of Florida, and arrives on feeding grounds in the Bay of Fundy and on the Scotian Shelf in the late summer. However, in a given year up to one third of the known population cannot be accounted for on the summer feeding grounds, leading to speculation that right whales may aggregate in an additional, and as yet undiscovered location.

Right whales form strong social bonds between mother and calf but do not appear to form male-female bonds. Competition for females among males is high. Surface active groups (SAGs) are often formed when several males interact with a female. However, it is not known whether actual mating occurs during these activities. The actual time and place of right whale mating has not been conclusively determined. The gestation period is thought to be approximately 12 months with over three years (Knowlton et al. 1994) between calves (on average).

The North Atlantic right whale feeds mainly on the copepod Calanus finmarchicus, a type of zooplankton. Aggregations of copepods tend to be temporally and spatially patchy. This is thought to partially explain the broad changes in the distribution of right whales between and within years. Right whales often feed on concentrations of copepods, making periodic dives of up to twenty minutes in duration.

COSEWIC assessment

COSEWIC provides the following rationale for designating the North Atlantic right whale as endangered: The species, found only in the North Atlantic, was heavily reduced by whaling. The total population currently numbers about 322 animals (about 220-240 mature animals), has been decreasing during the last decade, and is experiencing high mortality from ship strikes and entanglement in fishing gear.

Threats to the North Atlantic right whale

Because of the small population size, any mortality may prove to be significant to recovery. Identified threats to the North Atlantic right whale include the following:

Entanglement in Fishing Gear

The distribution of the North Atlantic right whale overlaps areas of relatively intense fishing activity. Over 60 percent of all right whales bear scars from previous entanglements in fishing gear (Knowlton and Kraus 2001). Loose vertical ropes are thought to pose the greatest risk.

Ship Strikes

Over 35 percent of known right whale deaths between 1970 and 1999 were the result of ship strikes (Knowlton and Kraus, 2001). Right whale feeding and nursery grounds include some of the busiest commercial shipping areas on the eastern seaboard of North America. In addition, right whales behaviour (e.g. slow swimming speed) may make them more susceptible to injury from commercial shipping than other whale species.

The following issues could result in the degradation of right whale habitat and lead to increased mortality of right whales:

Noise: The impact of underwater noise on cetaceans is poorly understood. Increased levels of human activity particularly vessel traffic and seismic exploration may have an adverse effect on right whales.

Toxins: The effects of water-borne contaminants on marine mammals are poorly understood. Of primary concern is the contamination of food sources in the event of an oil spill.

Disturbance from Human Activity: The whale-watch and ecotourism industries are growing in areas frequented by right whales. Unregulated vessel traffic in the proximity of right whales may adversely alter right whale behaviour.

Protecting the North Atlantic right whale

Currently, there are two right whale conservation areas defined by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans. These are the Grand Manan Basin area of the Bay of Fundy and the Roseway Basin area of the Scotian Shelf. These areas represent known feeding aggregations of right whales during the summer months. In 2003, the shipping lanes into Saint John, New Brunswick were shifted in order to reduce the possibility of ship strikes on the right whales in the Grand Manan basin conservation area.

Future management measures for the North Atlantic right whale may focus on reducing the risk of entanglement in fishing gear, mandatory reporting of vessel traffic, reduction of noise levels for marine operations and limits to whale-watch effort and types of research activity.

Potential Impacts on Stakeholders

Under the Species at Risk Act, the North Atlantic right whale will be protected. Therefore, activities that affect the right whale or their habitat will be scrutinized. There is a range of management measures that may be implemented to protect the right whale; these measures may lead to a variety of impacts on stakeholders. The following list is not exhaustive; please use this consultation as an opportunity to comment omissions.

Fishing Industry

If fishing (or a particular fishing activity) is assessed to be a threat to the survival and recovery of the right whale, management measures will be taken to ensure the activity does not impact right whales. For example, management measures could affect gear types which deploy vertical lines in the water column.

Transportation and Commercial Industry

The marine transportation industry may be asked to carefully monitor and report their progress through areas where right whales are known to congregate, to reduce speed, and to reduce the levels of ship generated noise to the marine environment.

Whale Watch Industry

The whale-watch industry may be asked to adhere to strict regulations involving approaches to right whales. These regulations could include: distance of approach, noise levels of vessels, the number of vessels in proximity to right whales at a given time and length of time with whales.

Research Activity

Those wishing to carry out research on the whales or in areas of their habitat may have to follow stricter guidelines. This may further limit the types of research permitted on right whales and may lengthen the lead time required for planning research projects. All research activity will be subject to a rigorous review process.

References

COSEWIC 2003. COSEWIC assessment and updated status report on the North Atlantic Right Whale Eubalaena glacialis in Canada. Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada. Ottawa. 28 pp.

Knowlton, A.R., Kraus, S.D., and Kenney, R.D. 1994. Reproduction in North Atlantic Right Whales (Eubalaena glacialis). Canadian Journal of Zoology 72: 1297-1305

Knowlton, A.R., and Kraus, S.D., 2001. Mortality and Serious Injury of northern right whales (Eubalaena glacialis) in the western North Atlantic Ocean. Journal of Cetacean Research and Management (special issue) 2: 193-208.

Consultation Workbook Survey – North Atlantic Right Whale

The government's decision on whether or not to list a species under the Species at Risk Act (SARA) will be based on a full description and understanding of the costs and benefits of the impacts of protection and recovery on individuals, organizations, First Nations, industries, and Canadian society in general. This survey form can be used to provide your opinions about listing the North Atlantic Right Whale under SARA. It also asks some general questions about conservation priorities and your awareness of other aquatic species at risk. Comments are welcome from individuals of all backgrounds, whether you are engaged in activities that may be affected by right whale conservation efforts or are a citizen with an interest in right whales. You should read the consultation workbook before completing these questions.

About the Consultation Workbook Survey

The consultation workbook survey asks you to answer a series of questions that require reflection about your views relating to the conservation and recovery of North Atlantic Right Whale in Atlantic Canada. There are a variety of question formats in this survey. There are also numerous opportunities for providing personal responses to further explain your views. If you would like to keep the introductory sections of this workbook, please feel free to detach this section and return only the survey. Please return your workbook to:

Species at Risk Coordination Office
Bedford Institute of Oceanography
P.O. Box 1006
1 Challenger Drive
Dartmouth, NS B2Y 4A2

Alternatively, you may email comments to XMARSARA@mar.dfo-mpo.gc.ca

To obtain additional copies of this workbook, please contact us at the address above or by phone at 1-866-891-0771

An electronic version of this survey may be accessed at www.sararegistry.gc.ca

The information that you provide is important! We very much appreciate the time and effort you take to complete this survey!

Your Opinion on Government Priorities

Commercial fishing, sport fishing, First Nation food and ceremonial fishing, and conservation needs are all considered when the government makes decisions about conservation policies and programs.

Please choose an option that reflects your rating of the importance of these considerations in ocean management
 Very Low PrioritySomewhat Low PriorityModerate PrioritySomewhat High PriorityVery High Priority
Recreational Fishing     
Commercial Fishing      
Marine Industries     
Conservation     
First Nations Food and Ceremonial Fishing     

Do you have any other comments about how conservation priorities should be determined? If so, please use the space below.

Your Awareness about Aquatic Species at Risk in the Maritimes

This table shows a number of listed and proposed species at risk in the Maritimes (COSEWIC designations are provided). For each, please indicate your knowledge of this species.

 I am not familiar with this speciesI am somewhat familiar with this speciesI am very familiar with this species
Inner Bay of Fundy Atlantic Salmon (current SARA status: endangered)   
Atlantic Whitefish (current SARA status: endangered)   
LakeUtopiaDwarf Smelt (current SARA status: threatened)   
Leatherback Turtle (current SARA status: endangered)   
Atlantic Wolffish (current SARA status: special concern)   
North Atlantic Right Whale (proposed SARA status: endangered)   
Blue Whale (proposed SARA status: endangered)   
Northern Bottlenose Whale (proposed SARA status: endangered)   
Cusk (proposed SARA status: threatened)   
Porbeagle Shark (proposed SARA status: endangered)   
Yellow Lampmussel (proposed SARA status: special concern)   

Your Opinions about Conservation Priorities for Aquatic Species at Risk in Atlantic Canada

Please choose an option that reflects your rating of what level of priority should be placed on conservation efforts for this species.

 Very Low Conser-vation PrioritySomewhat Low Conser-vation PriorityModerate Conser-vation PrioritySomewhat High Conser-vation PriorityVery High Conser-vation PriorityI am not Familiar with this Species so Cannot Say
Inner Bay of Fundy Atlantic Salmon (current SARA status: endangered)      
Atlantic Whitefish (current SARA status: endangered)      
Lake UtopiaDwarf Smelt (current SARA status: threatened)      
Leatherback Turtle (current SARA status: endangered)      
Atlantic Wolffish (current SARA status: special concern)      
North Atlantic Right Whale (proposed SARA status: endangered)      
Blue Whale (proposed SARA status: endangered)      
Northern Bottlenose Whale (proposed SARA status: endangered)      
Cusk (proposed SARA status: threatened)      
Porbeagle Shark (proposed SARA status: endangered)      
Yellow Lampmussel (proposed SARA status: special concern)      

Your Opinions About Conservation Priorities for Aquatic Species at Risk inAtlantic Canada

Could you please rank this list of Atlantic species from the one you think should be the highest priority target for conservation (#1) to the one that you think should be lowest priority (#8). Please rank them so that each has a unique ranking and there are no ties. Note that the list includes two additional species (cusk, northern bottlenose whale) that are currently proposed for listing.

Further information on these species is available at the Species at Risk Act website (http://www.speciesatrisk.gc.ca/search/default_e.cfm).

A. Leatherback Turtle First(Highest) Priority
B. CuskSecond Priority
C. Blue WhaleThird Priority
D. Inner Bay of Fundy Atlantic SalmonFourth Priority
E. Lake Utopia Dwarf SmeltFifth Priority
F. Northern Bottlenose WhaleSixth Priority
G. North Atlantic Right WhaleSeventh Priority
H. Atlantic WhitefishEighth (Lowest) Priority

 Your Opinions About Threats to Right Whales

For each factor, please indicate your opinion about how important a threat that factor really is to right whales.

 Very LowSomewhat LowModerateSomewhat
High
Very HighI Have NoOpinion
On This Factor
Disturbance by Whale-Watching Tours      
Fishing using Mobile Gear(e.g., trawl nets)      
Disruption of the Right Whale Food Chain      
Noise Caused by Vessels or Seismic Testing      
Disturbance by Scientific Researchers      
Global Warming and Ocean Current Change      
Vessel Strikes      
Contamination by Human Pollutants      
Fishing using Fixed Gear (e.g., traps, gillnets, longlines)      

LEVEL OF THREAT THIS FACTOR POSES TO NORTH ATLANTIC RIGHT WHALES

Do you have any comments about other possible factors that may threaten right whale survival and recovery? If so, please use the space below or the back of this sheet of paper.

Your Opinions About Possible Interventions to Help Right Whale Conservation and Recovery

For each factor, please indicate your opinion about how important this measure could be for helping right whale conservation and recovery.

POTENTIAL IMPACT ON NORTH ATLANTIC RIGHT WHALE RECOVERY

 Very LowSomewhat LowModerateSomewhat HighVery HighI Have No Opinion On This Factor
Increase the Size of Fines for Harming Right Whales      
Impose Access Restrictions on Tourism or Research Vessels to Avoid Disturbance      
Develop a Sighting and Reporting Network for Vessel Traffic and Fishers      
Impose Temporary Fishing Closures when Right Whales are in an Area      
Encourage Industry to Develop 'Best Practice' Codes      
Slow Down Vessel Traffic      
Develop and Fund More Whale Disentanglement Teams      
Develop Low-Impact Fishing Gear      
More Monitoring and Enforcement of Existing Conservation Rules      
Conduct Scientific Research to Better Understand Right Whale Behaviour      
Increase Public Awareness about the Plight of Right  Whales      

Do you have any other comments about how other interventions might help right whale conservation and recovery? If so, please use the back of this sheet of paper.

Your Opinion About the Potential Direct or Indirect Costs of Right Whale Conservation and Recovery

Please choose an option that reflects your rating of the likely economic impacts (direct and indirect) of right whale conservation and recovery to this industry or group.

POTENTIAL DIRECT AND/OR INDIRECT COSTS OF NORTH ATLANTIC RIGHT WHALE RECOVERY

 NegligibleSomewhat LowModerateSomewhat HighVery HighI Have No Opinion On This Factor
Costs to Pelagic Longline Fishers      
Costs to Fixed Gear Lobster Fishers      
Costs to Fixed Gear Groundfish Fishers      
Costs to the Shipping Industry      
Costs to my Personal Household      
Costs to Mobile Gear Fishers      
Costs to the Oil and Gas Industry      
Costs to Whale-Watching Tour Operators      

Do you have any other comments about how conservation interventions might lead to costs on other people or industry sectors? Costs might be direct (e.g., increasing the cost of doing business) or they might be indirect (e.g., lost opportunities for commercial activities). If so, please use the space below or the back of this sheet of paper.

Your Opinion About the Potential Benefits of Right Whale Conservation and Recovery to Canadian Society

Please choose an option that reflects your rating of the likely benefits (economic or social) of right whale conservation and recovery to this industry or segment of society.

POTENTIAL BENEFITS OF NORTH ATLANTIC RIGHT WHALE RECOVERY

 NegligibleSomewhat LowModerateSomewhat HighVery HighI Have No Opinion On This Factor
Benefits to Maritime Coastal Communities      
Benefits to the Tourism Industry      
Benefits to Canadian Society as a Whole      
Benefits to First Nations      

Your Opinion About Other Potential Benefits of Right Whale Conservation and Recovery

Please choose an option that reflects your level of agreement or disagreement with the following statements.

 STRONGLY DISAGREESOMEWHAT DISAGREENEITHER AGREE NOR DISAGREESOMEWHAT AGREESTRONGLY AGREE
I think that right whales are valuable because they play an important role in maintaining healthy marine ecosystems.     
I think that right whales will be valuable to future generations.     
I think that many people in Canada value right whales even though they may never personally see a right whale.     
Preserving environmental quality over the long-term is more important than creating more jobs in the short term     

Do you have any other comments about who might benefit from right whale conservation and how important this benefit might be? If so, please use the space below or the back of this page.

Background Information about You

What is Your Age Category?

  • < 20 Years
  • 20-29 Years
  • 30-39 Years
  • 40-49 Years
  • 50-59 Years
  • 60-69 Years
  • 70 Years

What is Your Gender?

  • Female
  • Male

Where do you live?

  • Nova Scotia
  • New Brunswick
  • Prince Edward Island
  • Newfoundland and Labrador
  • Quebec
  • Ontario
  • Western Canada or Territories
  • Outside Canada but I am a Canadian Citizen or Permanent Resident
  • Outside Canada - I am not a Canadian Citizen or Permanent Resident

In which sector are you employed?

  • Retired
  • Full-Time Homemaker
  • Student
  • Commercial Fishing/Processing
  • Farming
  • Forestry
  • Oil and Gas
  • Professional Services
  • Private Sector – Other
  • Academic
  • Government
  • Non-Governmental Organization
  • I am Between Jobs
  • I am Employed in another Field

If you work in the commercial fishing or processing industry, what types of commercial fishing activities have you engaged in over the past 5 years? Please check all the applicable boxes.

Work in a Processing Plant

  • Fish for Groundfish on a Fixed Gear Vessel (< (' 45’))
  • Fish for Groundfish on a Fixed Gear Vessel (> (' 45’))
  • Fish for Groundfish on a Mobile Gear Vessel
  • Fish for Lobster
  • Fish for Scallops
  • Fish for Snow Crab
  • Fish for Large Pelagics on a Longline Vessel
  • Work in the Aquaculture Industry
  • Fish for Other Species or Using Other Methods

Final Comments

Do you have any other comments about this survey or SARA that you would like to share with us? If so, please use the space below or the back of this sheet of paper.

You've now finished the survey - thanks very much for your help